Ceviche with tiger’s blood


Tiger's blood is the Peruvian term for the marinade for ceviche; some brave souls drink it on its own.

You'll need

100 gm sweet potato, cut into 5mm dice 16 mussels, scrubbed clean 250 ml (1 cup) boiling water 8 small Pacific oysters 8 New Zealand surf clams (vongole) 4 cuttlefish, cleaned and skin removed 200 gm sashimi-grade kingfish belly, skin off and pin-boned 8 scallops To serve: flaked pink salt and extra-virgin olive oil To serve: Spanish onion, thinly sliced For garnish: small handful coriander leaves 8 thin slices lime (optional)   Tiger’s blood 100 gm sea urchin roe 3 piquillo peppers, drained red birdseye chilli 500 ml reserved juices from seafood and mussels 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil Juice of ½ lime

Method

  • 01
  • Blanch the sweet potato in salted boiling water for a few seconds (it should be cooked, but still have a bit of crunch), then cool in iced water and drain.
  • 02
  • Place a large saucepan with a lid over high heat for 3 minutes, or until it is very hot. Have the cleaned mussels and water ready. Add the mussels and water and quickly put the lid on. The mussels will cook in about a minute (make sure you shake the pan halfway through). Check to see if all the mussels have opened; if not, cook for a further minute until they have. Strain their cooking liquid into a bowl and put it aside to cool to room temperature.
  • 03
  • Take the mussels out of their shells and use a small, thin-bladed knife to prise open any that haven’t opened to check that they are good. Remove any beards and put the mussels in a clean bowl or plastic container. Cover with their cooled cooking liquid and keep in the fridge.
  • 04
  • Shuck the oysters and clams, reserving and straining any of their juices through a fine sieve. Thinly slice the cuttlefish (you’ll need about 8 tablespoons’ worth). Dice the kingfish about 1cm thick (again, you’ll need about 8 tablespoons’ worth). Thinly slice the scallops.
  • 05
  • Strain the mussels through a fine sieve, reserving their liquid, then divide all the seafood between 8 small chilled glasses or shallow Champagne saucers.
  • 06
  • For the tiger’s blood, blitz the roe, peppers and chilli with the combined seafood juices in a blender, then add the extra virgin olive oil and lime juice, to taste. Strain through a fine sieve.
  • 07
  • Season the seafood with a pinch of pink salt and drizzle generously with extra virgin olive oil. Add some cooked sweet potato and a few thin slices of red onion. Whisk the tiger’s blood quickly, then pour into the glasses so it comes halfway up the seafood. Garnish with coriander and lime, then serve.
Note This recipe is from Recipes for a Good Time (RRP $59.95) by Elvis Abrahanowicz & Ben Milgate, published by Murdoch Books, and has been reproduced with minor Gourmet Traveller style changes.

At A Glance

  • Serves 8 people
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At A Glance

  • Serves 8 people

Featured in

Nov 2013

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