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Mascarpone

Confit goose, peach, bitter leaf and dried cranberry salad


"Confit is a wonderful technique to master - it's such an easy thing to reheat and serve in many different ways," says Jeremy Strode. "I learnt this technique with Pierre Koffmann at La Tante Claire. He's from Gascony, which is the heartland in France for duck and goose. This is typical of something I'd do with confit - adding fresh, crisp and acidic ingredients to offset its richness." Start this recipe a day ahead to cure the goose and steep the cranberries.

You'll need

3 cups (loosely packed) watercress 2 witlof, trimmed, coarsely chopped crossways 2 cups rocket, trimmed, torn 1 radicchio, trimmed, torn 1 curly endive (pale heart only), trimmed 2 peaches (not overripe), cut into thin wedges   Goose leg confit 100 gm sea salt flakes 1 tbsp black peppercorns 8 dried bay leaves, coarsely crumbled 12 thyme sprigs 1 tsp juniper berries, coarsely crushed with a mortar and pestle 4 goose or duck legs (see roast goose breast recipe) 750 gm goose or duck fat (see note)   Cranberry and mustard vinaigrette 3 tsp Dijon mustard 60 ml (1/4 cup) red wine vinegar 150 ml extra-virgin olive oil 35 gm (1/4 cup) dried cranberries

Method

  • 01
  • For goose leg confit, combine salt and half each of the peppercorns, bay leaves, thyme and juniper in a bowl. Sprinkle half over the base of a non-reactive container that hold the legs snugly in a single layer, place legs on top, sprinkle remaining salt mixture over, cover and refrigerate overnight to cure. Next day, preheat oven to 160C. Rinse legs under cold water, then pat dry with paper towels. Melt fat in a casserole over low heat, add remaining spices and herbs and legs, cover with a lid and place in oven until the meat falls from the bone (2-2½ hours). Remove from oven, gently transfer legs to a dish with a slotted spoon, strain fat over legs to cover completely, cover and refrigerate until required. Confit will keep if completely submerged in fat for 2 months.
  • 02
  • For cranberry and mustard vinaigrette, whisk together mustard, vinegar and oil in a bowl and season to taste. Add cranberries and set aside to steep (at least 4 hours or overnight).
  • 03
  • Preheat oven to 180C and stand confit for 10-15 minutes to soften fat. Gently remove legs from the fat (reserve for roasting the potatoes), place skin-side down in an ovenproof non-stick or cast-iron frying pan, and roast until golden brown (12-15 minutes). Drain on paper towels, then cut 3 of the legs in half, separating the thigh and drumstick. Shred the meat of the remaining leg and keep warm.
  • 04
  • Meanwhile, wash and dry leaves and divide among serving bowls. Scatter with peach and shredded leg meat, dress with vinaigrette, top with leg pieces and serve.

Note Duck and goose fat is available in cans or jars from select delicatessens.


At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people
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At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people

Drink Suggestion

You need something textural and fresh to cut through the goose and cranberry. An Alsace riesling or grand cru, such as Albert Boxler Grand Cru Brand, would work well.

Featured in

Dec 2014

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