Gourmet Fast app

Get our Gourmet Fast app and you can download 140 recipes for your iPhone.

Subscribe to Gourmet

Subscribe this month and you'll get 15 issues for $79.95. That's a savings of 40% off the annual retail price. Offer ends 25 January.

Gourmet on your iPad

Download the latest issue of Gourmet Traveller for your iPad.

Recipes for big cuts

Go big this season with cuts large enough to feed a crowd: legs of lamb, sides of beef, suckling pigs, and whole fish. The pineapple jerked pork neck with crushed pineapple relish and black bean and rice salad is calling your name...

Top 10 Sydney Restaurants 2014

Looking for the best restaurants in Sydney? Here are the top ten Sydney restaurants from our 2014 Australian Restaurant Guide.

Australian expats' most-missed hometown favourites

As we celebrate Australia Day, we ask leading expats about their most-missed hometown flavours and haunts.

Bali's best local food

You haven’t eaten on Indonesia’s most popular island until you’ve explored the rich, bold flavours found in the traditional warungs. Bali insider Maya Kerthyasa takes us on a tour of the best.

Jamaican goat curry

"Goat is the world's most consumed meat and we hardly give it a look in Australia. I adore it in so many different preparations, from South-East Asian dishes through to Italian braises, but my favourite is Jamaican curry with its heady spices," says Evans. "I see spices as nature's medicine cabinet and use them in as much of my cooking as possible. If you can't get your hands on quality goat meat (farmers' markets are a good bet or online), then feel free to substitute lamb or another protein. But if you've never had goat before, I urge you to give it a whirl."

Top 10 Melbourne Restaurants 2014

Looking for the best restaurants in Melbourne? Here's our top ten from our 2014 Australian Restaurant Guide.

Pavlova Recipes

Everyone loves a pav. Here are some of our favourite recipes.

Kung Pao chicken

"I'm a longtime GT subscriber and fan. My fiance is obsessed with the Kung Pao chicken from Mr Wong in Sydney. He keeps trying to replicate it every time he goes near the kitchen. The results haven't been too bad, but he isn't happy with them, which means further experimentation. Would you please ask for the recipe so we can move on to something else?" Jules Clancy, Cooma, NSW REQUEST A RECIPE To request a recipe, write to Fare Exchange, Australian Gourmet Traveller, GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 2001, or email fareexchange@bauer-media.com.au. Please include the restaurant's name and address or business card, as well as your name and address.

Kedgeree


You'll need

200 gm (1 cup) basmati rice 500 ml (2 cups) milk 2 fresh bay leaves 600 gm smoked haddock (see note) 4 eggs, at room temperature 40 gm butter, coarsely chopped 2 tsp mild curry powder (see note) 1 onion, finely chopped 1 clove of garlic, finely chopped 1 tsp finely grated ginger ¼ cup finely chopped flat-leaf parsley To serve: lemon wedges and mango chutney

Method

  • 01
  • Combine rice, 1 cup water and 1 tsp sea salt in a heavy-based saucepan and bring to the boil over medium heat. Stir, cover, reduce heat to low and simmer gently until water has been absorbed and rice is cooked through (about 15 minutes). Remove from heat, cool completely, then fluff grains using a fork.
  • 02
  • Bring milk, bay leaves and 2 cups of water to the boil in a saucepan over medium heat. Reduce heat to low, add fish and simmer until fish flakes easily (10 minutes). Cool in liquid, remove and coarsely flake, discarding skin and bones. Reserve 1 cup of poaching liquid.
  • 03
  • Meanwhile, place eggs in a saucepan, cover with cold water, bring to the boil and cook for 4 minutes. Drain, refresh under cold running water, peel, thinly slice and set aside.
  • 04
  • Melt butter in a frying pan over medium heat, add curry, onion, garlic and ginger and sauté until onion is soft (about 5 minutes). Add rice and fish, stirring to combine, and cook until heated through (about 3 minutes). Add poaching liquid, egg and parsley, stirring to combine, and cook until eggs are warm (about 2 minutes). Season to taste with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Serve with lemon and chutney to the side.
Note Smoked haddock is available from fishmongers. If unavailable, substitute with other smoked fish. We’ve used Herbie’s Spices mild curry powder.

“At the thought of a kedgeree made with smoked haddock and plenty of hard-boiled eggs,” writes Elizabeth David in Spices, Salt and Aromatics in the English Kitchen, “English eyes grow dreamy and the smell of an English country house dining room at breakfast time… comes back to tease and tantalise.”

File this one under fusion gone horribly right. Like curry, mulligatawny, Worcester sauce and a slew of other English foods, kedgeree was born of England’s colonisation of India. Traditionally a breakfast dish, it equally satisfies the Victorian love of fish (and smoked fish) and eggs for breakfast and the Bombay breakfaster’s need for a solid and tasty meal that combines carbs and protein in a way that sets one up for a day’s labour. The Hindi dish khichri, kedgeree’s precursor, is recorded recognisably in references dating back to the 14th century, according to The Oxford Companion to Food: “Hobson-Jobson quotes the Arab trader Ibn Batuta (1340): ‘the munj [mung beans or lentils] is boiled with rice, then buttered and eaten.’”

The introduction of flaked or smoked fish is thought to have been a British take on the originally vegetarian dish, and when the dish left the subcontinent it also seems to have lost its leguminous component, the fish becoming the sole protein.

It’s rarely seen at breakfast nowadays – brunch at a pinch – and more often graces lunch or even supper spreads. Variations stretch from those that embrace the dish’s subcontinental origins and include rich (and sometimes hot) spicing, reinstate the legumes, and garnish with coriander, chilli and fried onion, to the more genteel, English-country-garden versions, which tend to swap chives, cress or parsley for coriander, play down the curry flavours, keeping spicing to mace and bay, and play up the butter and hard-boiled eggs. Richer versions, too, include the addition of cream or, as we have in this recipe, the milk used to poach the smoked fish.

It’s worth noting that in presenting their take on kedgeree on TV’s Two Fat Ladies, Clarissa Dickson Wright and the late Jennifer Paterson – kedgeree lovers of the first order – maintained that the apocryphal Colonel’s maid who brought the dish back to England sans lentils struck a winning blow against vegetarians in doing so: “Hurrah! Get rid of all lentils,” said Dickson Wright. “You’ve no idea how randy they make vegetarians.”

At A Glance

  • Serves 4 people
Win
a trip to the Gold Coast!

Celebrate the opening of Kiyomi with an accommodation and dining package for two people at Jupiters Hotel & Casino on the Gold Coast.

Read More
Win
dinner for two at Park Hyatt Sydney!

Win one of two double passes to enjoy a uniquely crafted seven-course dinner tasting menu at Park Hyatt Sydney.

Enter now
Gourmet TV

Check out our video section for our latest cover recipes, chef cooking demos, interviews and more.

Watch Now

At A Glance

  • Serves 4 people

You might also like...

Quick meals

recipes

Christmas pudding ice-cream

Beer recipes

recipes

Raspberry and Mint Mojito

Summer seafood recipes

recipes

Serge Dansereau: Blueberry vanilla tart

Summer salads

recipes

Barbecue trout bundles with prosciutto and button mushrooms

Quick summer meals

recipes

Serge Dansereau: Homemade lemonade

Christmas classic recipes

recipes

Serge Danserau: Duck confit and potato terrine

Adriano Zumbo's Christmas recipes

recipes

Serge Dansereau: Leek tartlets

Holiday entertaining recipes

recipes

conversion tool

 
get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.