The February issue

Our clean eating issue is out now, packed with super lunch bowls, gluten-free desserts and more - including our cruising special, covering all luxury on the seas.

Subscribe to Gourmet

Subscribe to Australian Gourmet Traveller and receive a free Gourmet Menus book - offer ends 26 February 2017.

Gourmet digital

Subscribe to Gourmet Traveller for your iPad or Android tablet.

Curtis Stone's strawberry, elderflower and brioche summer puddings

"Think of this dessert as a deconstructed version of a summer pudding, with thinly sliced strawberries macerated in elderflower liqueur and layered between slices of brioche," says Stone. "A dollop of whipped cream on top is a cooling counterpoint to the floral flavours."

Fig recipes

Figs. We can't get enough of them. Here are a few sweet and savoury ways to add them to your summer spread.

Australia's best rieslings

We’re spoilt for variety – and value – in Australia when it comes to good riesling. Max Allen picks the top 20 from a fine crop.

Most popular recipes summer 2017

Counting down from 20, here are this summer's most-loved recipes.

Chorizo hotdogs with chimichurri and smoky red relish

A hotdog is all about the condiments. Here, choose between a smoky red capsicum relish or the bright flavours of chimichurri, or go for a bit of both.

Top Australian chefs to follow on Instagram in 2017

A lot has changed since we first published our pick of the best chefs to follow on Instagram (way back in the dark ages of 2013). Here’s who we’re double-tapping on the photo-sharing app right now.

Christine Manfield recipes

As the '90s dawned, darling chefs were pushing the boundaries of cooking in this country. A young Christine Manfield, just starting out at this heady time, soon became part of the generation that redefined modern Australian cuisine. She shares some of her timeless signatures from the era.

Mascarpone

Eggnog


You'll need

3 eggs, separated 100 gm caster sugar 275 ml milk 375 ml (1½ cups) thickened cream 60 ml Bourbon 40 ml each dark rum and brandy Pinch of mixed spice To serve: finely grated nutmeg

Method

  • 01
  • Whisk yolks and sugar in a bowl until pale and thick (4-6 minutes). Add milk and 250ml cream and whisk to combine. Add Bourbon, rum, brandy and mixed spice and whisk to combine. Refrigerate for flavours to develop (5 hours-overnight).
  • 02
  • Whisk eggwhites in an electric mixer until stiff peaks form (2-3 minutes), then fold in milk mixture. Whisk remaining cream in an electric mixer until soft peaks form, fold into eggwhite mixture and serve sprinkled with nutmeg.

'Tis the season to be jolly, fa-la-la-la-la and all that jazz. We're guessing whoever came up with that little ditty was rosy-cheeked and clutching a generous mug of foamy, frothy, booze-laced eggnog.

The name dates back to the late 18th century, although there's no consensus on how it came about. The "egg" part at least is self-explanatory, but there are a few possible explanations of "nog". In 17th-century England the word described a type of strong beer, while the word "noggin" referred to a small mug or quantity of liquor.

Eggnog, with its combination of egg, dairy, alcohol and spices, is a variation on a couple of other English concoctions, the medieval posset (hot milk curdled with ale and spices) and caudle (warmed ale thickened with egg yolks and sweetened with honey).

It has also been known as an eggflip, referring to the method of "flipping" the mixture - rapidly pouring it from one jug to another - to mix the ingredients and make the drink foamy.

The name alone is enough to bring a smile to your face. It sounds faintly ridiculous and child-like, but make no mistake - despite its innocent milky appearance, this is one grown-up drink.

The British traditionally laced their version of eggnog with Sherry, Madeira or brandy, while across the Atlantic the Americans embraced New World hooch with gusto and added rum instead.

Other parts of the world have their own versions too. In Puerto Rico they have coquito made with coconut milk; in Mexico it's rompope. Germany has a Biersuppe, while the French have lait de poule.

Eggnog is still embedded in the festive traditions of England, Europe and the US. Although such a rich drink may seem at odds with our warmer climate, it's unexpectedly refreshing. The key is to chill it thoroughly, which offers the added benefit of giving the spices more time to infuse.

It's so satisfying that it could almost do double duty as a dessert. But in this season of festivity and celebration, it seems fitting to indulge in both. So this Christmas, we'll be washing down our pudding with a glass or two of chilled eggnog. Christmas spirit indeed.


At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people
GT
Signature Collection

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

Read More
Recipe collections

Looking for ways to make the most out of seasonal produce? Want to find a recipe perfect for a party? Or just after fresh ideas for dessert? Either way, our recipe collections have you covered.

See more
2017 Restaurant Guide

Our 2017 Restaurant Guide is online, covering over 400 restaurants Australia wide. Never wonder where to dine again.

See more

At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people

Featured in

Dec 2012

You might also like...

Laugenbrezel

recipes

Cassoulet

Jerk chicken with coconut rice and pineapple relish

recipes

Cinnamon sugar doughnuts

Chinese spring rolls

recipes

Chocolate mousse with pink grapefruit and vanilla cream

Tortillas

recipes

conversion tool

 
get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.

×