Healthy Eating

We're championing fresh food that packs a flavour punch, from salads and vegetable-packed bowls to grains and light desserts.

Subscribe to Gourmet

Subscribe to Australian Gourmet Traveller for your chance to win a $20,000 Flight Centre gift card! Offer ends 24 May 2017.

Gourmet digital

Subscribe to Gourmet Traveller for your iPad or Android tablet.

OzHarvest opens Australia's first free supermarket

"This is about dignity. This is about anyone walking through this door, taking what they need, and only giving back if they can."

Anzac biscuit desserts

These four desserts have one thing in common – Anzac biscuits.

Six sexy panna cottas

We say si to these six takes on the Italian classic. From coffee and caramel to red wine and figs, panna cotta proves to be a versatile dessert to suit all palettes.

Okonomiyaki with sticky soy pork belly

Persian red lentil soup with tahini, beetroot and fried mint

Lentil soup may not sound like the sexiest of dishes, but rest assured, it's a heart-warmer. We've added warming spices and served the soup with a dollop of garlicky tahini. Thin slivers of shaved raw beetroot add earthiness and texture - the beetroot is also excellent simply grated and served piled on top. The poached egg is optional, but highly recommended.

Blue Nile's Ethiopian eggplant dip

"I'd love the recipe for the eggplant dip the wonderful Fatuma Tikuye serves at Blue Nile in Blacktown." - Helena Rosebery, Annandale, NSW REQUEST A RECIPE To request a recipe, email fareexchange@bauer-media.com.au or write to Fare Exchange, Australian Gourmet Traveller, GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 2001. Please include the restaurant's name and address or business card, as well as your name and address.

Eclair recipes

Here are four spins on the classic French eclair, from Flour & Stone's pillowy choux pastry with salted caramel to a colourful take with strawberry-flecked creme fraiche filling and sprinkled pistachios on top.

Fifty-four thoughts at Noma Mexico

"12. I'm now sitting at Noma with no shoes on. I feel like a toddler in a sandpit."

Eggnog


You'll need

3 eggs, separated 100 gm caster sugar 275 ml milk 375 ml (1½ cups) thickened cream 60 ml Bourbon 40 ml each dark rum and brandy Pinch of mixed spice To serve: finely grated nutmeg

Method

  • 01
  • Whisk yolks and sugar in a bowl until pale and thick (4-6 minutes). Add milk and 250ml cream and whisk to combine. Add Bourbon, rum, brandy and mixed spice and whisk to combine. Refrigerate for flavours to develop (5 hours-overnight).
  • 02
  • Whisk eggwhites in an electric mixer until stiff peaks form (2-3 minutes), then fold in milk mixture. Whisk remaining cream in an electric mixer until soft peaks form, fold into eggwhite mixture and serve sprinkled with nutmeg.

'Tis the season to be jolly, fa-la-la-la-la and all that jazz. We're guessing whoever came up with that little ditty was rosy-cheeked and clutching a generous mug of foamy, frothy, booze-laced eggnog.

The name dates back to the late 18th century, although there's no consensus on how it came about. The "egg" part at least is self-explanatory, but there are a few possible explanations of "nog". In 17th-century England the word described a type of strong beer, while the word "noggin" referred to a small mug or quantity of liquor.

Eggnog, with its combination of egg, dairy, alcohol and spices, is a variation on a couple of other English concoctions, the medieval posset (hot milk curdled with ale and spices) and caudle (warmed ale thickened with egg yolks and sweetened with honey).

It has also been known as an eggflip, referring to the method of "flipping" the mixture - rapidly pouring it from one jug to another - to mix the ingredients and make the drink foamy.

The name alone is enough to bring a smile to your face. It sounds faintly ridiculous and child-like, but make no mistake - despite its innocent milky appearance, this is one grown-up drink.

The British traditionally laced their version of eggnog with Sherry, Madeira or brandy, while across the Atlantic the Americans embraced New World hooch with gusto and added rum instead.

Other parts of the world have their own versions too. In Puerto Rico they have coquito made with coconut milk; in Mexico it's rompope. Germany has a Biersuppe, while the French have lait de poule.

Eggnog is still embedded in the festive traditions of England, Europe and the US. Although such a rich drink may seem at odds with our warmer climate, it's unexpectedly refreshing. The key is to chill it thoroughly, which offers the added benefit of giving the spices more time to infuse.

It's so satisfying that it could almost do double duty as a dessert. But in this season of festivity and celebration, it seems fitting to indulge in both. So this Christmas, we'll be washing down our pudding with a glass or two of chilled eggnog. Christmas spirit indeed.


At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people
GT
Signature Collection

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

Read More
Recipe collections

Looking for ways to make the most out of seasonal produce? Want to find a recipe perfect for a party? Or just after fresh ideas for dessert? Either way, our recipe collections have you covered.

See more
2017 Restaurant Guide

Our 2017 Restaurant Guide is online, covering over 400 restaurants Australia wide. Never wonder where to dine again.

See more

At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people

Featured in

Dec 2012

You might also like...

Laugenbrezel

recipes

Cassoulet

Jerk chicken with coconut rice and pineapple relish

recipes

Cinnamon sugar doughnuts

Chinese spring rolls

recipes

Chocolate mousse with pink grapefruit and vanilla cream

Tortillas

recipes

conversion tool

 
get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.

×