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Gnocchi alla Romana with saltimbocca

You'll need

1 veal loin (about 650gm), cut widthways into 8 8 thin prosciutto slices 1½ tbsp thinly sliced sage, plus 8 sage leaves 40 gm butter, coarsely chopped 150 ml white wine   Gnocchi alla Romana 700 ml chicken stock 200 ml milk 210 gm coarse semolina 2 eggs 1 tbsp thyme leaves 50 gm unsalted butter, melted 25 gm (1/3 cup) finely grated parmesan


  • 01
  • For gnocchi alla Romana, bring stock, milk and semolina to the boil in a saucepan over medium-high heat, then whisk continuously until thick (1-2 minutes). Whisk in eggs and thyme, then pour mixture into a 20cm x 30cm buttered baking dish and refrigerate until firm (1-2 hours).
  • 02
  • Meanwhile, pound veal pieces between two sheets of baking paper until 4mm thick. Scatter over sliced sage, wrap each piece with a slice of prosciutto and set aside.
  • 03
  • Preheat grill to high heat. Butter a large 20cm x 30cm baking dish. Cut rounds from semolina mixture with a 3cm or 4cm fluted cutter and place snugly in dish. Pour over butter, scatter with parmesan, season to taste and grill until gnocchi are heated through and golden (4-6 minutes).
  • 04
  • Heat half the butter in a large frying pan over high heat until foaming, add half the sage leaves and half the veal and cook, turning once, until golden and just cooked (1-2 minutes on each side), remove from heat and keep warm, then repeat with remaining butter, sage leaves and veal. Return veal to pan, deglaze with white wine and serve hot with gnocchi alla Romana.

This is a combination of two of Rome's best-known dishes. Gnocchi alla Romana are made from semolina and milk, not potato or ricotta, and they are grilled, not boiled; they have a taste not dissimilar to polenta. Saltimbocca, meaning "jump in the mouth", is veal rolled in prosciutto and sage. It's important to heat the pan really well before adding the veal to ensure you sear the meat rather than stew it.

At A Glance

  • Serves 4 people
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At A Glance

  • Serves 4 people

Drink Suggestion

A bright young Chianti.

Featured in

May 2011

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