GT tableware

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

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Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection tableware by Robert Gordon

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Lebanese-style snapper

"This dish is Lebanese-peasant done fancy with all the peasant-style flavours you'll find in Lebanese cooking, but with a beautiful piece of fish added," says Bacash. "The trick to not overcooking fish is to be aware that it cooks from the outside inwards and the centre should only cook until it's warm, not hot. If it gets hot in the middle, it will become overcooked from the residual heat. It takes a little practise getting to know this - be conscious of the inside of the fish and not the outside. Until you get it right, you can always get a little paring knife and peek inside the flesh when you think it's ready; it won't damage it too much."

12-hour barbecue beef brisket

"Texas is world-renowned for barbecuing a mean brisket, the flat and fatty slab of meat, cut from the cow's lower chest," says Stone. "Cooking a simply seasoned brisket low and slow on a smoker (or kettle barbecue when barbecuing at home), gradually rendering the gummy white fat while simultaneously infusing smoky flavour into the meat, is a labour of love. Although time-consuming, briskets are not difficult to cook. And while you'll note that this one takes a whopping 12 hours to cook, don't be alarmed if your brisket needs another hour or so - this timing is an approximation, and greatly depends on the size of your brisket and heat of your barbecue." The brisket can also be cooked in an oven (see note).

Banana cream pie


"You have to plan ahead for this one - buy ripe bananas and let them get nearly black/brown before accepting them as the rrrrrripe bananas needed for this recipe. Another great option: we peel just-ripe bananas, freeze them, and let them finish developing their flavour in the freezer for 2 days or up to 2 weeks. Said rrrrrripe bananas are the difference between having your banana pie tasting like banana Laffy Taffy and the most delicious, deep banana cream pie ever. When you make the pie shell, use disposable kitchen gloves to keep your hands from looking like a mechanic's who just changed someone's oil."

You'll need

1 just-ripe banana, sliced, plus extra (optional) to serve   Banana cream 225 gm rrrrrripe bananas (about 2) 80 ml (1/3 cup) pouring cream 60 ml (¼ cup) milk 100 gm white sugar 25 gm cornflour 3 egg yolks 40 gm butter, coarsely chopped ½ tsp yellow food colouring 180 ml pouring cream 160 gm icing sugar   Chocolate crust 70 gm plain flour 3 gm cornflour 40 gm Dutch-process cocoa, preferably Valrhona 75 gm white sugar 75 gm butter, melted

Method

  • 01
  • For banana cream, purée bananas, cream and milk in a blender until totally smooth, add sugar, cornflour, yolks and ½ tsp sea salt and blend until homogenous. Transfer to a saucepan and whisk continuously over low-medium heat until thickened. Bring to the boil, whisking continuously to cook out starch (2 minutes). The mixture will resemble thick glue, bordering on cement, with a colour to match. Transfer to a clean blender and add butter. Squeeze gelatine to remove excess water, add to blender and blend until smooth. Colour the mixture with yellow food colouring until it is a bright cartoon-banana yellow. (It’s a ton of colouring, I know, but banana creams don’t get that brilliant yellow colour on their own). Transfer to a container and refrigerate until completely cool (30-60 minutes). Whisk cream and icing sugar in an electric mixer to medium-soft peaks, add banana mixture and whisk until evenly coloured and homogenous. Banana cream will keep stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 5 days.
  • 02
  • For chocolate crust, preheat oven to 150C. Beat flour, cornflour, cocoa, 65gm sugar and ¾ tsp sea salt in an electric mixer on low speed to combine. Add 60gm melted butter and beat until mixture forms small clusters. Spread on an oven tray lined with baking paper and bake, breaking up crumbs occasionally, until slightly moist to the touch (20 minutes). Cool completely, then pulse in a food processor until no sizeable clusters remain. Transfer to a bowl, add remaining sugar and 1/8 tsp sea salt and toss with your hands to combine. Add remaining melted butter and knead it into the mixture until it is moist enough to knead into a ball. If it is not moist enough to do so, melt an additional 14gm butter and knead it in. Press evenly into base and up sides of a 25cm-diameter pie tin and refrigerate until chilled.
  • 03
  • Pour half the banana cream into the pie shell. Cover it with a layer of sliced bananas, then cover the bananas with the remaining banana cream. The pie should be stored in the refrigerator and eaten within a day. Serve it topped with extra banana if you like.

Note One silver-strength gelatine leaf will set 250ml of liquid to a firm set. If you can't find silver-strength gelatine leaves, you can substitute an equivalent quantity, in terms of setting power, of other gelatine leaves.


At A Glance

  • Serves 10 people
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Signature Collection

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At A Glance

  • Serves 10 people

Featured in

Nov 2012

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