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Autumn recipes

Comfort food and fun Easter eats feature in our collection of autumn recipes, featuring everything from an Italian Easter tart to carrot doughnuts with cream cheese glaze and brown sugar crumb and braised lamb with Jerusalem artichokes, carrots and cumin to breakfast curry with roti and poached egg.

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Looking for the best restaurants in Sydney? Here are the top ten Sydney restaurants from our 2014 Australian Restaurant Guide.

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Italian Easter tart

"This is a traditional tart eaten in Naples at Easter," says Ingram. "The legend goes that a mermaid called Parthenope in the Gulf of Napoli would sing to celebrate the arrival of spring each year. One year, to say thank you, the Neapolitans offered her gifts of ricotta, flour, eggs, wheat, perfumed orange flowers and spices. She took them to her kingdom under the sea, where the gods made them into a cake. I love to add nibs of chocolate to Parthenope cake because I think it marries nicely with the candied orange and sultanas, but, really, do you need an excuse to add chocolate to anything?" Start this recipe a day ahead to prepare the pastry and soak the sultanas.

Easter Baking Recipes

Dust off your mixing spoon, man your oven and have your eggs at the ready as we present some of our all-time favourite Easter baking recipes, from praline bread pudding to those all-important hot cross buns.

Apple and cinnamon hot cross buns

The mix of candied apple and dried apple combined with a sticky cinnamon glaze provides a new twist on an old favourite. These buns are equally good served warm on the day of baking, or several days later, toasted, with lashings of butter.

Momofuku's steamed buns

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Family favourites


You'll need

2 sheets shop-bought puff pastry 2 cups (500ml) milk Scraped seeds of 1 vanilla bean 100 gm cornflour ½ cup caster sugar 4 egg yolks, at room temperature For dusting: sieved icing sugar

Method

  • 01
  • Preheat the oven to 210C and line two oven trays with baking paper.
  • 02
  • Place the sheets of puff pastry on the prepared trays and bake until crisp and golden. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool.
  • 03
  • Heat the milk and vanilla seeds in a small saucepan over medium heat and bring to the boil, then remove from the heat.
  • 04
  • Place the cornflour and sugar in a heatproof bowl. Add the egg yolks and whisk until pale and creamy. Add one-third of the hot milk and stir to combine, then add the remaining hot milk and stir to combine.
  • 05
  • Return the mixture to the pan over low heat and bring to a gentle boil, then transfer to a bowl and leave to cool completely.
  • 06
  • Line a 25cm x 12cm straight-sided cake tin with enough plastic wrap so that it hangs over the sides. Trim the pastry sheets to fit the tin. Place one pastry sheet in the base of the tin, add the custard and evenly spread. Top with the remaining pastry sheet and refrigerate until the custard is set, ideally overnight.
  • 07
  • Remove from the tin using the plastic wrap as handles, generously dust with icing sugar and cut into 6-8 slices.
Note “Vanilla slice takes me straight back in time to the school tuckshop. Back then, I didn’t appreciate the time and skill that went into making these delicious treats. The trickiest part of this recipe is making sure the custard sets perfectly. My first couple of batches turned out a bit sloppy but I didn’t let them go to waste – they were still delicious and I just ate them with a spoon. If your first attempt doesn’t set right, don’t be disheartened – it will still taste good. Keep trying until you get the ideal set.”

Australia’s Favourite Recipes, edited by Leila McKinnon, is published by Plum Pan Macmillan ($29.99, pbk). The recipe here has been reproduced with minor GT style changes.

This recipe is from the November 2012 issue of Australian Gourmet Traveller.

Australia’s restaurants, chefs and produce are acknowledged as among the best in the world. Our baristas have taken over Europe, flat white by long black. But it’s what’s going on in our suburban kitchens that deserves the wildest of nationalistic chest thumping.

I should know: I’ve stuck my nose into hundreds of handwritten recipe books in the past year, sniffing out old gems and modern classics like a Tasmanian truffle pig. And best of all, I’ve begged permission to publish them in the unlikeliest of places: a cookbook edited by me, a news journalist, and ordained by our greatest food revolutionary, Margaret Fulton.

Australia’s Favourite Recipes started out as a way for me to get my unimaginative hands on some good, honest everyday recipes for home. I was never short of a dinner party recipe, but what I needed were dishes I could cook on a weeknight with ingredients I could buy from the corner shop, dishes that took less than 30 minutes to make, and treats that one day my kids would come home for and be transported back to their childhoods. I wanted the dishes families have made and enjoyed week after week, often for generations, and never tired of.

We did a shout-out on the Today show, we asked for recipes on radio and called for submissions on Facebook. In the end we received several hundred and had to whittle them down to just over 70. They came in spidery handwriting by mail, in shouty capitals on Facebook, and with photos of grandpas, nonnas, hungry kids, and proud home cooks. And with a few notable exceptions (ham cooked in instant coffee, anyone? Schnitzel with banana-avocado sauce?) they were fresh, inspired and nourishing.

There were plenty of lovingly perfected lasagnes and lamingtons, but also some outstanding exotics. Steve Wide’s jewelled freekeh salad mixes pomegranate and hearty lentils with mint, almonds and currants; it’s an absolute delight. There were Italian dishes from nonna, and noodles from the Philippines. There were stories of lunch-box treats (chocolate Weet-Bix slice from Margaret of Mollymook) and of a boyfriend brought home to meet mum over a zesty lime and chocolate green pudding. I threw in a few of my all-time best fallbacks including vanilla slice, my lasagne (yes, I do think my version is the best – doesn’t everyone think that about their own?), and a lemon yoghurt cake that’s one of the quickest, most fuss-free cake recipes around.

Armed with this plunder, I went about the dream task of putting together a recipe book. The team and I set up camp in a cottage in country Victoria in the depths of winter. Detouring around flooded roads, well prepared with wellies and beanies, we began a cooking, photographing and eating marathon.

The process was quite a revelation for this novice food editor. By day two I found myself sounding like a real pro with proclamations such as, “We’re going to have to swap that hero mussel for a hero prawn, and move that white pepper pot more to the right of frame” or, “Ahem, we need fresher herbs on the salmon – those baked herbs look like they’d set the sniffer dogs barking at a music festival.”

By day five we were running out of patience, vintage tea towels, and holes with which to loosen our belts. But we’d put together a snap­shot of 21st-century Australian home dining.

It’s only fitting that a community-based true-blue charity should benefit from this treasure trove, so I approached Legacy with an offer of a large portion of the profits. Since World War I, Legacy’s incredible volunteers have been helping the families of our deceased and incapacitated servicemen and women, and unfortunately their work has been needed by every successive generation.

The cover recipe – the icing on the cake, if you like – is a Margaret Fulton berry-meringue creation, a cross between a good old pavlova and a vacherin. It’s as exciting as Fulton’s forthright assertion tha

At A Glance

  • Serves 8 people
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At A Glance

  • Serves 8 people

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