Ciaramicola


You'll need

3 large eggs, at room temperature 60 ml pomegranate liqueur (see note) 6 drops rose pink colouring (optional) Scraped seeds of 1 vanilla bean 230 gm plain flour, sifted 150 gm caster sugar ¾ tsp baking powder 185 gm unsalted butter, at room temperature To decorate: hundreds-and-thousands   Italian meringue 180 gm caster sugar 3 eggwhites Pinch of cream of tartar

Method

  • 01
  • Preheat oven to 170C. Combine eggs, liqueur, colouring and vanilla in a bowl. Mix dry ingredients and a pinch of salt in an electric mixer on low speed, add butter and half the egg mixture, mix until moistened, increase speed to medium and beat for 1 minute. Add remaining egg mixture in 2 batches, beating well after each addition. Transfer to a 1.5-litre buttered and flour-dusted bundt tin, tap tin on bench to level mixture, bake until cake is golden and a skewer withdraws clean (25-35 minutes; see note). Cool in tin for 10 minutes, then turn onto a wire rack.
  • 02
  • For Italian meringue, stir sugar and 200ml water in a small saucepan over high heat until sugar dissolves. Reduce heat to medium and brush down sides of pan with a wet pastry brush to remove sugar crystals. Cook until syrup reaches 115C on a sugar thermometer (soft ball stage; 8-12 minutes). Whisk eggwhite with cream of tartar in an electric mixer on medium speed until soft peaks form. Meanwhile, bring sugar syrup to 121C (hard ball stage). Increase mixer speed to high and gradually pour syrup into meringue (be careful as hot syrup may spatter). Beat at medium speed until glossy and cooled to room temperature (10-15 minutes). Spoon immediately over cake and spread into peaks with a palette knife. Scatter with hundreds-and-thousands and serve.
Note Pomegranate liqueur is available from select liquor shops; you can substitute pomegranate juice. The cake may crack on top as it cooks, but this doesn't matter because the top becomes the base.

This recipe is from the April 2012 issue of Australian Gourmet Traveller.

Umbria is famous for truffles, mountains and art. We'd like to think this meringue-topped cake from Perugia combines at least the art and the mountains. It's traditionally baked by the women of the region for their future husbands. Most recipes call for a scarlet-coloured liqueur called Alchermes to give the cake mixture its tint; it's hard to find in Australia, so we've used pomegranate liqueur instead. Ciaramicola is best eaten on the day it's made, and is particularly good served warm. Go wild with the sprinkles.

At A Glance

  • Serves 10 people
GT
Signature Collection

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

Read More
Recipe collections

Looking for fresh dinner ideas? Not sure how to make the most out of seasonal produce? Or do you need to plan the perfect party menu? Our recipe collections have you covered.

See more

At A Glance

  • Serves 10 people

You might also like...

Easter lunch recipes

recipes

Christmas pudding ice-cream

Cupcake recipes

recipes

Raspberry and Mint Mojito

Thomas Keller's sandwich recipes

recipes

Neil Perry: Prawn cocktail

Grilling recipes

recipes

Serge Dansereau: Blueberry vanilla tart

Neil Perry's Spice Temple recipes

recipes

Barbecue trout bundles with prosciutto and button mushrooms

Pickle and preserve recipes

recipes

Serge Dansereau: Homemade lemonade

Sexy salad recipes

recipes

Serge Danserau: Duck confit and potato terrine

Recipes from Australia's best chefs

recipes

conversion tool

 
get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.

×