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Comfort food and fun Easter eats feature in our collection of autumn recipes, featuring everything from an Italian Easter tart to carrot doughnuts with cream cheese glaze and brown sugar crumb and braised lamb with Jerusalem artichokes, carrots and cumin to breakfast curry with roti and poached egg.

Chocolate Recipes for Easter

Easter + chocolate: it just makes sense. So, in celebration of the annual cocoa frenzy we’ve put together a collection of our hottest chocolate recipes. You’re welcome.

Easter Baking Recipes

Dust off your mixing spoon, man your oven and have your eggs at the ready as we present some of our all-time favourite Easter baking recipes, from praline bread pudding to those all-important hot cross buns.

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Apple and cinnamon hot cross buns

The mix of candied apple and dried apple combined with a sticky cinnamon glaze provides a new twist on an old favourite. These buns are equally good served warm on the day of baking, or several days later, toasted, with lashings of butter.

Italian Easter tart

"This is a traditional tart eaten in Naples at Easter," says Ingram. "The legend goes that a mermaid called Parthenope in the Gulf of Napoli would sing to celebrate the arrival of spring each year. One year, to say thank you, the Neapolitans offered her gifts of ricotta, flour, eggs, wheat, perfumed orange flowers and spices. She took them to her kingdom under the sea, where the gods made them into a cake. I love to add nibs of chocolate to Parthenope cake because I think it marries nicely with the candied orange and sultanas, but, really, do you need an excuse to add chocolate to anything?" Start this recipe a day ahead to prepare the pastry and soak the sultanas.

Momofuku's steamed buns

December: Cherries


You'll need

  Cherry salad 500 gm Rainier cherries, pitted and halved (see note) 500 gm red cherries, pitted and halved 2 tbsp caster sugar 125 ml (½ cup) rosé   Almond-milk granita 750 ml (3 cups) milk 125 ml (½ cup) latte di mandorla (see note) 1 tsp orange blossom water

Method

  • 01
  • For almond-milk granita, combine all of the ingredients in a bowl, pour into a large freezer-proof container and freeze until half frozen. Remove from freezer and, using a fork, break mixture into small ice flakes, then freeze for another 1-2 hours or until granita is just frozen. Using a fork, stir once more, breaking mixture into ice flakes.
  • 02
  • For the cherry salad, combine cherries, caster sugar and rosé and stand for 1 hour. Serve cherries with a little of the rosé syrup and the granita.
Note Rainier cherries are available from Snowgoose. Latte di mandorla is sweetened almond-milk concentrate, available from Simon Johnson.

Summer equals excitement, and a big part of that thrill in the kitchen is the first flush of ripe cherries. The luscious fruit's season is as short-lived as it is cherished and anticipated and the first box to arrive is traditionally auctioned at the Sydney Markets; this year's auction in October raised a record $55,000 for charity. Cherries are grown in the south-eastern states, with 50 per cent of national production being from Young and Orange in New South Wales - a cold winter setting the blossom and late spring and summer sun ripening the fruit. The eating season is from October to February, peaking in quality around Christmas.

Cherries have been around since pre-history, writes Jonathan Roberts inThe Origins of Fruit and Vegetables(Harper Collins), originating in the mountain valleys and upland forests of central Asia. The Romans cultivated them throughout Europe, and their interest in cherries can be seen in a wall painting depicting birds eating cherries in the 'Villa Poppaea at Oplontis', which was buried in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD. It was the Romans who introduced cherries to England, where Kent is the main producer, and from where they were taken to New England in the 18th century during the English colonisation of America. Today the US is the second-largest producer of cherries worldwide, with Germany being the first. The fruit we see on greengrocer shelves in the depths of winter is part of the US's crops. Cherries can be found growing throughout most temperate regions of the world.

Varieties
Cherries are a member of the genus prunus, which includes apricots, peaches, plums and other stone fruit. There are two main cherry species: sweet cherries are often sold as just generic fresh cherries, but on occasion you can find specific varieties such as summit, sweetheart and Bing available in the Australian market; they vary in colour from light- to deep-red and almost black. The rarer Rainier 'white' cherry, another sweet variety, has a beautiful, creamy yellow skin with a red blush.

Sour cherries are more commonly grown in Europe, but there are some plantations in Australia - in Victoria and Tasmania. The most well-known sour cherry is the morello. It is typically preserved and used in cooking and for making kirsch (cherry brandy).

Today there are hundreds of varieties and many more being developed. In Australia the cherry is so highly prized that several new varieties produced by the South Australian Research and Development Institute in recent years have been named after local identities, the most famous being the Sir Don. Others include Sir Hans (Heysen, the painter), Sir Douglas (Mawson, the Antarctic explorer) and Dame Nancy (Buttfield, South Australia's first woman to serve in federal parliament).

How to buy, store...
Choose cherries that have shiny, unblemished skins, firm flesh and stems attached. Store, unwashed, in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to a week or in their box for two-plus weeks. They may be frozen for up to three months, but are best cooked after freezing.

And cook
Sweet cherries are best eaten raw as a snack, in salads or otherwise macerated in alcohol or fruit juice and sugar. They can be cooked in sauces or made into preserves. Sour cherries are best cooked and preserved for use in desserts such as black forest cake, strudels and pies.

*For pickled cherries to accompany roast venison or pork, combine red wine vinegar, white sugar, bay leaf, allspice and cloves in a saucepan, bring to the boil, reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Place cherries in a hot sterilised jar, pour over pickling syrup, seal and store for up to 6 months.

*For chocolate marzipan cherries, melt coarsely chopped dark chocolate (70 per cent cocoa solids) in a heat-proof bowl over simmering water. Pit the cherries, roll marzipan into small balls


At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people
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At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people

Additional Notes

ALSO IN SEASON

Fruit
Apricots, bananas, berries (gooseberry, loganberry, raspberry, strawberry), cherries, currants (blackcurrant, redcurrant), lychees, melons (honeydew, rockmelon, watermelon), oranges, passionfruit, pineapples, rambutans, starfruit.

Vegetables
Asparagus, avocado (hass), beans (green, snake), capsicum, celery, choko, cucumber, eggplant, lettuce, onions (salad, spring), peas (green, snow, sugarsnap), radish, squash, sweetcorn, tomato, watercress, zucchini, zucchini flower.

Seafood
Asian squid, Atlantic salmon, bay prawn, bigeye tuna, blue swimmer crab, goldband snapper, greenback flounder, rock lobster, Roe’s abalone, Spring Bay scallops, tiger flathead.

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