Healthy Eating

We're championing fresh food that packs a flavour punch, from salads and vegetable-packed bowls to grains and light desserts.

Subscribe to Gourmet

Subscribe to Australian Gourmet Traveller and receive a free salt and pepper set - offer ends 26 March, 2017

Gourmet digital

Subscribe to Gourmet Traveller for your iPad or Android tablet.

Flour and Stone Recipes

Baker extraordinaire Nadine Ingram of Sydney's Flour and Stone cooks up a sweet storm for Easter, including the much loved bakery's greatest hit.

Fast autumn dinners

Autumn weather signals the arrival of soups, broths, roasts and more hearty meals.

Roasted cauliflower salad with yoghurt dressing and almonds

The cauliflower is roasted until it starts to caramelise, which adds extra depth of flavour to this winning salad. Serve it warm or at room temperature.

Melbournes finest meet Worlds Best

Leading chefs descend on Melbourne in April for The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. We asked local hospitality folk who they’d abduct for the day and where they’d take them to show off their city. There may be coffee, there may be culture, but in the end it’s cocktails.

1980s recipes

Australia saw some bold moves in the ’80s, and we’re not just talking hairstyles. Greater cultural references started peppering the menus of our restaurants, and home-grown ingredients won a new appreciation. The dining scene was coming of age and a new band of pioneers led the charge.

New cruises 2017

Cue the Champagne.

Savoury tarts

Will your next baking project be a flaky puff pastry with pumpkin, goat's curd and thyme, or a classic bacon and Stilton tart? As autumn settles in, we're ticking these off one by one.

Labne and pistachio cheesecake

The luscious silky texture of this tangy cheesecake makes it irresistible - the fact it's free of gluten and refined sugar is a bonus. We've topped ours with cherries, but berries would also work well. Start this recipe a day ahead to drain the yoghurt.

January: Honey-baked nectarines with orange-blossom and labne


You'll need

500 gm thick natural yoghurt 25 gm unsalted butter, coarsely chopped 6 ripe but firm nectarines, halved 100 gm honey 5 cardamom pods, bruised 1 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped ½ orange, thinly peeled rind only 1 orange, juice only 2 tsp orange-blossom water

Method

  • 01
  • Spoon yoghurt into a muslin-lined sieve placed over a deep bowl, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight to drain.
  • 02
  • Preheat oven to 180C. Dot butter over the base of a baking dish large enough to hold nectarines snugly in a single layer. Place nectarines cut-side up in dish, drizzle with honey, scatter over cardamom, vanilla bean and seeds and orange rind. Pour over orange juice, bake until tender and golden (15-20 minutes). Sprinkle over orange-blossom water and serve warm or chilled with a dollop of labne.
Note You'll need to begin this recipe a day ahead.

This recipe is from the January 2010 issue of Australian Gourmet Traveller.

Watermelon
I could spend the entire summer eating just fruit because it’s all I want on a hot, lazy day, and there’s such a great selection of wonderful produce at its peak. In January, my fridge is packed with a big wedge of watermelon, grapes, mangoes, nectarines, apricots and berries. I bought my first wedge of the season – which was seedless – back in late November on an unseasonably hot day, and I was delighted to find it was completely delicious, full of watermelon sweetness and flavour.

I used to think seedless varieties skimped a bit on flavour, but growers have obviously made improvements in recent years, which is excellent because watermelon pips were the only downside to this happy fruit. Now it is also possible to buy the Champagne melon, which has pretty much the same flavour as the traditional pink watermelon but has yellow flesh.

I find eating a big slice of chilled watermelon such a refreshing and simple pleasure. It’s also great in desserts and cocktails, such as watermelon juice with white rum, gin and mint, muddled and served with ice. I learnt a fabulous dessert from Greg Malouf where you cut neat little wedges of watermelon, pile them on the plate, drizzle them generously with a cardamom, lime and rosewater syrup and serve the lot with homemade cherry ice-cream – it’s a great way to finish a dinner party because it’s pretty as well as delicate and beautiful to eat.

It’s difficult to advise on selecting watermelon, because it’s now mostly sold already cut, and even full melons are not very revealing of their qualities. A whole melon should feel heavy for its size and have no cracks or blemishes on the outside. For the best and sweetest tasting watermelons, buy half or quarter pieces in the height of the season from a good source, and avoid those small poly-styrene trays of pre-cut fruit that have been refrigerated for who knows how long.

Mulberries
I have very fond memories of Christmases spent with a family in Castlemaine, Victoria, who had a huge mulberry tree in their backyard. I loved to stand under its lush green foliage on a hot summer’s morning eating mulberries that were ripe and soft. When the mulberries were ready to eat, they would turn from pale red to a deep blood purple, and the ground would be splattered with dark mulberry juice.

A mature mulberry will grow into a handsome gnarly tree with bright green heart-shaped leaves. The tree is quite beautiful and I have vowed to grow one as soon as I own a backyard big enough. Mulberries are rarely seen on the market because of their delicate nature – when they’re ripe they are squishy, full of juice, won’t last long and don’t travel well. They taste best ripened on the tree and won’t ripen further once picked. So hopefully you know someone with a tree, then you can enjoy mulberries stirred through homemade vanilla ice-cream (my favourite), in jam on toast, or on a custard tart made with buttery sweet pastry. They are also delicious baked in a simple lemon tea cake or made into a syrup to have chilled over ice water.

There are three different kinds of mulberry – white, red and black, the black being far the superior tasting of the three and the most commonly planted here. If you do find them at the market, look for fruit that is a deep shade of purple and is not bruised or seeping juice and eat them straight away.

Nectarines
One of the great pleasures of an Australian summer is the abundance of stone fruit. Every market, grocer and supermarket in December and January has its shelves piled with peaches, apricots and nectarines, and for me, their fruity scent is the harbinger of summer.

Nectarines, which are actually smooth-skinned peaches, are a highlight in January. There are the common yellow nectarines and then the more delicate and very pretty white nectarines, which I am pleased we are seeing more of lately. Enjoy them


At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people
GT
Signature Collection

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

Read More
Recipe collections

Looking for ways to make the most out of seasonal produce? Want to find a recipe perfect for a party? Or just after fresh ideas for dessert? Either way, our recipe collections have you covered.

See more
2017 Restaurant Guide

Our 2017 Restaurant Guide is online, covering over 400 restaurants Australia wide. Never wonder where to dine again.

See more

At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people

Additional Notes

ALSO IN SEASON

FRUIT
Apricots, bananas, berries, cherries, currants, lemons, lychees, mangoes, passionfruit, pineapples, plums, rockmelons, tamarillos.

VEGETABLES
Avocados, beans, capsicum, celery, chokoes, cucumbers, eggplant, lettuce, okra, onions, peas, radishes, squash, tomatoes, zucchini.

SEAFOOD
Balmain bugs, goldband snapper, mud crab, Sydney rock oysters.

You might also like...

Chef's spaghetti Bolognese recipes: L to Z

recipes

Christmas pudding ice-cream

Chef's spaghetti Bolognese recipes: B to K

recipes

Raspberry and Mint Mojito

Mother's Day recipes

recipes

Neil Perry: Prawn cocktail

Easter recipes

recipes

Serge Dansereau: Blueberry vanilla tart

Classic Italian recipes

recipes

Barbecue trout bundles with prosciutto and button mushrooms

Easter lunch recipes

recipes

Serge Dansereau: Homemade lemonade

Cupcake recipes

recipes

Serge Danserau: Duck confit and potato terrine

Thomas Keller's sandwich recipes

recipes

conversion tool

 
get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.

×