The Paris issue

Our October issue is on sale - the Paris special. Grab your copy for all-things Parisian, plus ultimate French baking recipes and more.

Subscribe to Gourmet

Subscribe to Australian Gourmet Traveller before October 24, 2016 and receive 3 BONUS ISSUES - save 46%.

Gourmet on your iPad

Subscribe to Gourmet Traveller for your iPad.

Zaru soba with tempura prawns

You'll need

  Soba 125 ml (½ cup) dark soy sauce 80 ml (1/3 cup) mirin 1 tsp white sugar 30 gm bonito flakes 250 gm dried green cha soba (see note) 3 green onions, thinly sliced, to serve To serve: minced ginger, wasabi and toasted nori   Dashi 15 gm kombu (see note) 15 gm bonito flakes   Tempura prawns 12 green prawns, peeled, veins removed, tails intact 150 gm tempura flour (see note) For deep-frying: vegetable oil


  • 01
  • For dashi, combine 550ml filtered water with kombu in a saucepan over low heat for 10 minutes. Bring just to a simmer, remove kombu and discard, bring stock to a rolling boil, add 60ml cold water, then add bonito flakes. Return to the boil, remove from heat and stand until bonito settles to the bottom. Strain through a muslin-lined sieve, discarding solids.
  • 02
  • Combine dashi, soy sauce, mirin and sugar in a saucepan. Bring to the boil, add bonito, remove from heat and refrigerate until completely chilled.
  • 03
  • Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil, add soba and return to the boil. Add 1 cup of cold water to pan. Return to the boil, then add another cup of cold water. Repeat this process 2 more times, depending on thickness of the soba, until noodles are just cooked. Drain, rinse well in cold water and set aside.
  • 04
  • For tempura prawns, make batter according to directions on flour packet. Heat oil in a deep-fryer to 180C. Coat prawns in batter and deep-fry for 2-3 minutes or until golden, then transfer to an absorbent paper-lined plate.
  • 05
  • Divide noodles among serving bowls and serve with individual dishes of dipping sauce, tempura prawns, green onion, minced ginger, wasabi and toasted nori for each person.
Note Green cha soba is made with the addition of green tea powder. Kombu, a type of seaweed used in Japan to make stock, is available at Asian grocery stores. Tempura flour, a combination of plain and corn flours, is available from Asian grocery stores.

Japan's soba is arguably the most iconic buckwheat noodle. In its earliest incarnation, soba was made entirely of buckwheat flour, creating a brittle, fragile noodle. For ease of handling it was steamed and served in a bamboo basket or slatted box called a zaru, hence the name of the following classic dish. These days, wheat flour is included when making soba. Soba has a close relative, Korea's naeng myun, made from buckwheat flour and potato starch. Naeng myun or 'cold noodles' are often served with a chilled beef broth and kimchi.

At A Glance

  • Serves 4 people
Signature Collection

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

Read More
things to do this autumn

Whether it's foraging for wild mushrooms in a picturesque Victorian forest or watching a film by moonlight in Darwin, we've got you covered with 20 exciting autumn experiences from around Australia.

Read More
Gourmet TV

Check out our YouTube channel for our latest cover recipes, chef cooking demos, interviews and more.

Watch Now

At A Glance

  • Serves 4 people

You might also like...

Adriano Zumbo's Christmas recipes


Christmas pudding ice-cream

Holiday entertaining recipes


Raspberry and Mint Mojito

David Thompson's Thai recipes


Neil Perry: Prawn cocktail

Strawberry recipes


Serge Dansereau: Blueberry vanilla tart

Longrain recipes


Barbecue trout bundles with prosciutto and button mushrooms

Barbecue recipes


Serge Dansereau: Homemade lemonade

Fast spring recipes


Serge Danserau: Duck confit and potato terrine

Chorizo recipes


conversion tool

get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.