The February issue

Our clean eating issue is out now, packed with super lunch bowls, gluten-free desserts and more - including our cruising special, covering all luxury on the seas.

Subscribe to Gourmet

Subscribe to Australian Gourmet Traveller and receive a free Gourmet Menus book - offer ends 26 February 2017.

Gourmet digital

Subscribe to Gourmet Traveller for your iPad or Android tablet.

Australia's top 20 rieslings
22.02.2017

We’re spoilt for variety – and value – in Australia when it comes to good riesling. Max Allen picks the top 20 from a fine crop.

Recipes by Christine Manfield
21.02.2017

As the '90s dawned, darling chefs were pushing the boundaries of cooking in this country. A young Christine Manfield, just starting out at this heady time, soon became part of the generation that redefined modern Australian cuisine. She shares some of her timeless signatures from the era.

Normandy landings
20.02.2017

To travel to Normandy along the Seine is to take it by stealth, writes Larissa Dubecki, who ventured forth in search of chateaux and Calvados.

Cirrus, Sydney review
20.02.2017

Cirrus moves the Bentley team down to the water and into more lighthearted territory without sacrificing polish, writes Pat Nourse.

How to grow rocket
20.02.2017

A vegetable patch without rocket lacks a great staple, according to Mat Pember. The perennial performer is a leaf for all seasons.

50BestTalks brings World’s best chefs to Sydney and Melbourne
16.02.2017

Massimo Bottura and more are coming to the Sydney Opera House.

Toby Wilson, Sean McManus and Jon Kennedy to open Bad Hombres
16.02.2017

Expect Mexican-Asian flavours and an all-natural wine list from two of Sydney’s edgier operators.

Local Knowledge: Moscow
16.02.2017

Director of Shakespeare theatre company Cheek by Jowl Declan Donnellan walks us through the essential sights and his favourite cafes and restaurants of his hometown.

Making stock


You'll need

  Chicken stock 3 kg chicken carcasses and bones, coarsely chopped 2 onions, coarsely chopped 1 celery stalk, coarsely chopped 1 carrot, coarsely chopped 1 leek, white part only, coarsely chopped 1 garlic head, halved 1 bouquet garni (see note) 8 white peppercorns   Veal stock 3 kg veal bones 2 onions, coarsely chopped 2 carrots, coarsely chopped 1 celery stalk, coarsely chopped 1 leek, washed and coarsely chopped 1 garlic head, halved 3 tomatoes, coarsely chopped 8 black peppercorns 1 bouquet garni (see note) 250 ml white wine   Fish stock 2 kg white fish bones, rinsed 1 leek, white part only, washed and coarsely chopped 1 onion, coarsely chopped 1 celery stalk, coarsely chopped 1 bouquet garni (see note) 6 white peppercorns   Vegetable stock 4 celery stalks, coarsely chopped 2 carrots, coarsely chopped 2 leeks, white part only, coarsely chopped 1 onion, coarsely chopped 4 garlic cloves, bruised 1 bouquet garni (see note) 6 white peppercorns

Method

  • 01
  • For chicken stock, remove as much fat as possible from bones, then rinse bones under cold running water and place in a large saucepan. Add vegetables, garlic, bouquet garni, peppercorns and enough water to cover bones, bring to the boil over medium-high heat, reduce heat to low and gently simmer, skimming occasionally until stock is well-flavoured (4-5 hours). Remove from heat, carefully strain through a muslin-lined fine sieve (discard solids). Cool to room temperature. Refrigerate stock until chilled and fat comes to the surface (2-4 hours), then carefully remove fat from surface. Makes about 3 litres. Stock will keep refrigerated for up to 3 days or frozen for up to 1 month. To make a brown chicken stock, preheat oven to 190C. Divide chicken carcass between two roasting pans and roast, rotating pans halfway through cooking until golden in colour (45 minutes-1 hour), then add vegetables to pan and roast until vegetables begin to colour (30 minutes), place in a large saucepan and follow as per above recipe.
  • 02
  • For veal stock, preheat oven to 190C. Divide bones between two roasting pans and roast, rotating pans halfway through cooking, until starting to colour (1 hour), then add onion, carrot, celery, leek and garlic to pan and roast until golden (40-50 minutes). Transfer bones and vegetables to a large saucepan, add tomatoes, peppercorns and bouquet garni and set aside. Deglaze roasting pan with wine (scraping the bottom of the pan), add to saucepan and cover completely with cold water. Bring to the boil over medium-high heat, reduce to low and lightly simmer, skimming occasionally until well-flavoured (6-7 hours). Remove from heat, carefully strain through a muslin-lined fine sieve (discard solids). Cool to room temperature. Refrigerate stock until chilled and fat comes to the surface (2-4 hours), then carefully remove fat from surface. Makes about 3 litres. Stock will keep refrigerated for up to 3 days or frozen for up to 1 month.
  • 03
  • For fish stock, place ingredients in a large saucepan and cover with water. Bring to the boil over medium heat, reduce to low and lightly simmer, skimming occasionally until well-flavoured (1 hour). Cool slightly (10 minutes), then carefully strain through a muslin-lined fine sieve. Cool to room temperature, then refrigerate stock until chilled (2-4 hours). Makes about 2½ litres. Stock will keep refrigerated for up to 3 days or frozen for up to 1 month.
  • 04
  • For vegetable stock, combine ingredients in a saucepan. Cover with cold water, bring to the boil over medium heat, then reduce to low and lightly simmer, skimming occasionally until stock is flavoured (30-40 minutes). Remove from heat, strain through a muslin-lined fine sieve (discard solids). Cool to room temperature then refrigerate stock until chilled (2-4 hours). Makes about 2 litres. Stock will keep refrigerated for up to 3 days and frozen for up to 1 month.

Note For a bouquet garni, wrap parsley stems, bay leaves and thyme sprigs in muslin.


Stock is the foundation of many dishes, so it's imperative to use a quality one or risk writing the whole dish off. You can buy stock, but generally the quality available is pretty poor, so you're better off making your own and freezing batches to have on hand when you need it. If you are buying stock, you may want to correct the flavour and mouth-feel before adding it to your dish. You can do this by adding more vegetables and meat scraps (browning the scraps first if using in a brown stock). Bought stocks don't contain a lot of gelatine - which comes from the bones and creates a jelly-like texture when chilled. Adding a pig's trotter to a large quantity of bought stock can increase the viscosity - this will help produce the desired sleekness in a finished sauce. Always taste your stock and make sure you are happy with the flavour before using, as you can't change it once added.

If you're going to the trouble of trying to correct a pre-made stock, then you may as well make your own from scratch. In general, a stock will simmer gently for a few hours, so there really isn't much legwork on your behalf, just pop it on the stove and leave it be. But first, there are a few important things to consider when making a stock.

With white stocks, it's important to rinse the bones under cold running water to remove any blood. This isn't necessary with brown stocks as the blood will cook and congeal before being added to the pan. Remember your stockpot isn't a garbage bin, so don't throw just anything into the stock. However, if you have any tomato and mushroom scraps you can add them to brown stocks to enhance the flavour.

Add enough water to the bones and vegetables to just cover them. The water must be cold to start with before bringing it up slowly to a very gentle boil. Once it is at this point, reduce the heat so the stock is only just bubbling away and cook for as long as it takes to infuse the water with the flavour. Fish and vegetable stock will take around 1-2 hours, white and brown chicken stock about 4-6 hours and veal, beef and lamb stock about 6-8 hours. The heartier the bones, the longer it takes to withdraw the essence. Once bubbling, it's important to occasionally skim any scum that rises to the surface. Apart from the skimming, leave the stock to gently tick over. If the heat is too high and it returns to the boil, throw a few ice cubes in to drop the temperature.

When the stock is ready, the straining is just as important. If you strain the stock, make sure to remove as much as you can first with a ladle, then scoop out the bones and vegetables with a spider or wire strainer, and discard, straining the remainder of the stock through a muslin-lined fine sieve. You can find muslin at most kitchenware stores. It can be a little expensive, but can be washed in some soap-free hot water, dried and re-used for your next stock. Muslin is useful as it's a fine gauze, therefore catching fine sediment from your stock and leaving you with a clean result.


GT
Signature Collection

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

Read More
Recipe collections

Looking for ways to make the most out of seasonal produce? Want to find a recipe perfect for a party? Or just after fresh ideas for dessert? Either way, our recipe collections have you covered.

See more
2017 Restaurant Guide

Our 2017 Restaurant Guide is online, covering over 400 restaurants Australia wide. Never wonder where to dine again.

See more

Featured in

Jun 2009

You might also like...

Winter flavours

recipes

Bodega's fish fingers

Spicy soups from around the world

recipes

Prawns with black beans, chorizo and chipotle

Brussels sprout recipes

recipes

Bodega's pork belly and bullhorn peppers

Christmas in July recipes

recipes

Mulled white wine

Recipes with lime

recipes

Pork chops with fennel

Rice pudding recipes

recipes

La bistecca di Dianne

Warming broth recipes

recipes

Japanese mustard-miso roasted beef fillet

Best winter breakfast recipes

recipes

conversion tool

 
get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.

×