The 50th Anniversary Issue

Our 50th birthday issue is on sale now. We're celebrating five decades of great food and travel with our biggest issue yet.

Subscribe to Gourmet

Subscribe to Australian Gourmet Traveller before 27th November, 2016 and receive a Villeroy & Boch platter!

Gourmet on your iPad

Subscribe to Gourmet Traveller for your iPad.

Cruise control: Captain Kent of the Emerald Princess

We caught up with Princess Cruises’ Captain William Kent to talk life on deck, sailing the Red Sea and how to spend 24 hours in Venice.

Midnight in Melbourne style

After-dark glamour calls for monochrome elegance with accents of red and the glimmer of bling. Martinis await.

Recipes by David Thompson

Thai food maestro David Thompson returns to the Sydney restaurant scene with the opening of Long Chim, a standard-bearer for Thailand’s robust street food. Fiery som dtum is just the beginning.

Reader dinner: Quay, Sydney

Join us at Quay for a specially designed dinner by Peter Gilmore to celebrate the launch of the new Gourmet Traveller cookbook.

GT's party hamper

We’ve partnered again with our friends at Snowgoose to bring you the ultimate party hamper. With each item selected by the Gourmet Traveller team, it’s all killer and no filler.

Aerin Lauder’s Morocco

Meet Aerin Lauder; creative director, lifestyle mogul, mother and global traveller. Here she shares her musings on Morocco, the exotic catalyst for her latest collection.

A hotel dedicated to gin is opening in London

A modern-day gin palace, The Distillery, is set to open in the middle of London’s Portobello Market this year.

Dan Hong's salt and pepper calamari with lime aioli

The executive chef shares his salt and pepper squid recipe, including his secret for a crisp, light batter.

Fine apple tart

Ultra-thin apple slices precisely arranged atop a puff pastry base equal simple, buttery perfection, writes Lisa Featherby.

You'll need

375 gm block puff pastry 50 gm finely chopped almonds 4 Fuji or gala apples For rubbing apples: lemon juice 30 gm butter, melted 90 gm caster sugar To serve: vanilla ice-cream


  • 01
  • Preheat oven to 240C. Roll out pastry on a lightly floured surface to 4mm thick.
  • 02
  • Cut out a 24cm-diameter round from the pastry using an upturned bowl as a guide.
  • 03
  • Place pastry on an oven tray lined with baking paper, scatter with almond and refrigerate until required.
  • 04
  • Working quickly, peel and core apples. Rub with lemon juice if they start to discolour.
  • 05
  • Thinly slice apples on a mandolin.
  • 06
  • Arrange apple slices in closely overlapping concentric rings on pastry, starting from the outside and working towards the centre.
  • 07
  • Brush evenly with melted butter.
  • 08
  • Scatter with 55gm sugar and bake, turning tray occasionally, and more regularly during the last 5-10 minutes of cooking to prevent pastry burning, until pastry is crisp and apples are golden (30-35 minutes).
  • 09
  • Heat grill to medium high, dust tart with remaining sugar and glaze, rotating tart occasionally under grill until caramelised (about 1 minute). Serve hot or warm with ice-cream.

It's important to use well-made butter puff pastry for the base. If you intend to make it yourself, take a look at our puff pastry recipe; otherwise, you can order some from your nearest bakery or pâtisserie. Puff pastry freezes well, so you can make a batch in advance and have it at hand for whenever the mood strikes. Just defrost it overnight in the refrigerator before using.

If you're buying ready-made, a block of pastry is preferable to ready-rolled sheets, so you have control over the thickness. Good puff pastry rises more than supermarket varieties, so the base needs to be rolled quite thinly - about 3mm-4mm should give you more than enough puffing. Once it's rolled out, you'll need to work quite quickly. You don't want the butter in the pastry to melt; pop it into the refrigerator it if it gets too soft. You can also dust it with flour to prevent it sticking while you work - just brush off any excess so it doesn't make the pastry tough.

Once you've rolled the pastry to the desired thickness, lift it away from the bench and rotate it a couple of times before cutting it out. This relaxes the pastry. If you cut out your round before doing this, the pastry will spring back once it's cut and you'll end up with an irregular shape.

The beauty of this tart is that you can make it any size you like. Here, we've used an upturned bowl as a template to measure a large round.

We've added a sprinkling of finely chopped almonds between the pastry and the apple layers - this isn't traditional, but it helps absorb excess moisture from the apples and doesn't hurt the taste and texture. You could also use almond meal to the same effect.

Work quickly with the apples, too, so they don't discolour. You can rub them with a little lemon juice as you go, but too much and the apple will break down during cooking.

Of course, it's best to use fresh, blemish-free fruit - gala or Fuji are ideal. A mandolin is the best way to achieve thin, even apple slices quickly. Once you've peeled and cored the apples, slice them horizontally to produce fine rounds.

Taking a bit of time to arrange your apple slices carefully pays dividends with the look of the finished tart. Working from the outside in, arrange the slices, in the order they were cut, in a ring, overlapping closely. Work your way towards the centre, creating concentric rings, each slightly overlapping the one before it, until the base is completely covered.

Finally, brush the apple slices with melted butter to coat, then dust it evenly with caster sugar. The fine grains will stick to the butter and melt quickly, caramelising and colouring the tart. Or you can refrigerate the tart after buttering until you're ready to bake it, making it the perfect prepare-ahead dessert for a dinner party. The melted butter helps to prevent the apples from oxidising in the refrigerator. Just dust it with sugar once you've removed it from the refrigerator (and keep in mind that if the tart has been chilled thoroughly, it'll need a little extra cooking time).

Puff pastry should be baked at a high heat so that the layers separate and become crisp and puffed. A flat, heavy-duty oven tray or baking sheet keeps the tart flat. It'll also absorb more heat than other oven trays so it's more likely to produce a crisp base.

In the event that your pastry is well cooked but your apples aren't as golden as you'd like, don't despair - simply sieve a little icing sugar over them and use the grill element of your oven or a blow-torch to caramelise them. Keep a watchful eye, though: the sugar can burn quickly. This handsome tart can be eaten at room temperature, but is at its finest served straight from the oven with a scoop of vanilla ice-cream.

At A Glance

  • Serves 8 people
Signature Collection

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

Read More
things to do this autumn

Whether it's foraging for wild mushrooms in a picturesque Victorian forest or watching a film by moonlight in Darwin, we've got you covered with 20 exciting autumn experiences from around Australia.

Read More
Gourmet TV

Check out our YouTube channel for our latest cover recipes, chef cooking demos, interviews and more.

Watch Now

At A Glance

  • Serves 8 people

Featured in

May 2013

You might also like...

Autumn recipes


Tempered chocolate

Braising recipes


Panettone, ricotta and peach cake

Italian recipes


Saltimbocca alla Romana

Fast autumn recipes


Roast lamb loin with couscous and pumpkin

Chocolate recipes


Ditali with broccolini and bread

Apple recipes


Chicken rolled with fontina, prosciutto and sage

Autumn vegetarian recipes


Fried provolone with red wine vinegar

Almond recipes


conversion tool

get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.