The summer issue

Our summer-packed January issue is out now - featuring our guide to summer rieslings, strawberries and seafood recipes, as well as a look at the best of Bali.

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Recipes with peaches

Whether caramelised in a tarte Tartin, paired with slow-roasted pork on top of pizza or tossed through salads, this sweet stone fruit is an excellent addition to summer cooking.

Black Star Pastry to open in Carlton, Melbourne

Instagram’s most famous cake, plus a few other sweet hits, is heading south.

AA Gill's final column for Gourmet Traveller

We mourn the loss of a treasured member of the Gourmet Traveller family who passed awayon December 10, 2016. British writer AA Gill was a contributor to the magazine from July 2004. Gill’s travel column was as insightful as it was witty, funny as it was thoughtful – he was without peer. This is the final piece he wrote for Gourmet Traveller; it appears in the December issue, 2016. - Anthea Loucas Bosha, Editor

Knives and Ink chef tattoos

What is it about chefs and tattoos? A new book asks the inked to answer for themselves.

Berry recipes

Whether it's raspberries paired with chocolate in a layer cake, or blueberries with lemon in a tart; berries are a welcome addition to any dessert. Here are delicious recipes with berries.

Seabourn Encore luxury cruise ship

Australia is about to get its first glimpse of Seabourn Encore, a glamorous new addition to the Seabourn fleet.

Ben Shewry's favourtie souvlaki restaurant in Melbourne Kalimera Souvlaki Art

Attica’s chef isn’t happiest when eating soils or smears on his days off, it’s souvlaki. We follow him to his favourite spot.

Coconut crab and green mango salad

"This salad bursts with fresh, vibrant flavours and became a signature on my Paramount menus," says Christine Manfield. "I capitalised on using green mangoes in many dishes as they became more widely available. Blue swimmer crabs from South Australia have the most delicious sweet meat. It's best to buy them whole, cook them yourself and carefully pick the meat from the shell - a tedious task but it gives the best flavour. This entree also works well with spanner crab meat (you can buy this in packs ready cooked from reliable fishmongers). The sweetness of the crab, the richness of the fresh coconut and the sourness of green mango make a wonderful partnership. It's all about harmony on the palate and using the very best produce."

Heal thyself

As Christmas looms again for another year, our thoughts turn to that timeless question: what is it about the festive season that makes otherwise perfectly normal, sensible, civilised people think it's a good idea to follow a good dinner and a skinful of wine with shots of absinthe? It's a strange process, going from having a jolly time to having one that ends in collapsing and the help of an ambulance to get home.  What does this tell us about perfectly normal, sensible, civilised people? More to the point, what does this tell us about Christmas? Is it possible that all those Santas and all that ho-ho-hoing are somehow upsetting?

We used to have an annual Christmas party, and when our friends reached a Negroni roar, it was time to watch out. We took our eyes off the situation for a moment on one occasion, and in a somewhat confused state, a good friend managed to lock themselves in the bathroom, only to smash their way out, leaving the top half of the bathroom door hanging. The kids were very impressed the next morning. The other thing that suffers is the floor (there's a reason we had ours laid with rubber). Having sent the children away for a night so they don't have to witness our generation at play, the floor becomes a mulch of spilled drink and cigarette ash. Still, months afterwards, they have a habit of finding cigarette butts in strange places. What people mistake for an ashtray makes the mind boggle - pencil cases, candle boxes and Action Man's gas-mask. Is there no shame? Once the last guests have left, we leave out a huge tip for the cleaning lady and shut ourselves away and wait for the coast to clear. As I said, perfectly normal, sensible, civilised people.

Of course, such sensible, civilised behaviour comes with repercussions for the imbiber, too. The key thing when you find yourself a victim of overindulgence is to have the remedy readily at hand.

So you may prepare yourself ahead of time, I offer these essential cures. First, Black Velvet. This mix of half Guinness and half Champagne can bring a man back from the edge. I speak with experience. Allow me to elaborate. The scene is the West Country, the occasion New Year's Eve, the poison tequila. Rather the worse for wear the night in question, I managed to make my way on all fours through a muddy lane, but when I got home and managed to stand, I promptly fell in a bush, losing my glasses and gaining some nasty scratches. I awoke the next morning in the bath, bloodied and blind. And I had agreed to cook 100 breakfasts. Somehow I made my way downstairs and had a Black Velvet. A miracle! All my scars, internal and external, healed, and someone found my glasses. Bring on the hundred breakfasts.

But enough tequila talk. What about a good bacon sandwich? A bacon sandwich washed down with a glass of cold cider should help open the eyes. I also have a weakness for a sausage roll with brown sauce. Not the best sausages, though. I feel the rusk element of not terribly good sausages helps restore the sense of gravity. Potatoes roasted in pork fat are also a sheltered harbour. How can a simple tuber be so restorative with just the aid of lard? The theory that fast food will sort you out is misguided. It's fast in nature, but short-term in rehabilitation stakes. On the other hand (and this is a bit left-field, I'll grant you), a very cold glass of good white Burgundy can be quite efficacious.

And then there is the Dr Henderson: two parts Fernet Branca, one part crème de menthe, served on crushed ice - it's a pick-me-up that comes with the bonus of minty freshness. It's perfect for that moment after a good lunch and as preparation for a good supper. Don't be put off by the fact that it looks like swamp water, because the Fernet is the thing. There is no more effective cure for maladies of the season than a shot of Fernet Branca straight up.

It puts organs to sleep, improves the humours - it's truly miraculous stuff. The wise man of today is the man who makes sure tomorrow's Fernet Branca is in place, and that goes double for the festive season.

In the end, a life of moderation moderated by a little bit of what you fancy is balanced out by plenty of water and sleep. Unfortunately, I often find the process of reconstruction almost as enjoyable as doing the damage the day before. Now, where did I put that absinthe?

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