GT tableware

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

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Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection tableware by Robert Gordon

We’ve teamed up with pottery house Robert Gordon to create a range of tableware – introducing the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection.

Lebanese-style snapper

"This dish is Lebanese-peasant done fancy with all the peasant-style flavours you'll find in Lebanese cooking, but with a beautiful piece of fish added," says Bacash. "The trick to not overcooking fish is to be aware that it cooks from the outside inwards and the centre should only cook until it's warm, not hot. If it gets hot in the middle, it will become overcooked from the residual heat. It takes a little practise getting to know this - be conscious of the inside of the fish and not the outside. Until you get it right, you can always get a little paring knife and peek inside the flesh when you think it's ready; it won't damage it too much."

12-hour barbecue beef brisket

"Texas is world-renowned for barbecuing a mean brisket, the flat and fatty slab of meat, cut from the cow's lower chest," says Stone. "Cooking a simply seasoned brisket low and slow on a smoker (or kettle barbecue when barbecuing at home), gradually rendering the gummy white fat while simultaneously infusing smoky flavour into the meat, is a labour of love. Although time-consuming, briskets are not difficult to cook. And while you'll note that this one takes a whopping 12 hours to cook, don't be alarmed if your brisket needs another hour or so - this timing is an approximation, and greatly depends on the size of your brisket and heat of your barbecue." The brisket can also be cooked in an oven (see note).

Tasting Australia: a preview

This May, Tasting Australia returns to Adelaide for eight delicious days of collaborations between some of the world's most influential cooks and producers.

Following on from the 2014 festival's "Origins" theme, the 2016 crop of dinners, lunches, workshops, discussions and tastings aims to get a bit more personal; it's all about "Landscapes", showcasing the cultural microcosms underpinning produce and cuisine.

"It's about championing the people that foraged its culture and history," says creative co-director, chef Simon Bryant. "Our guests have assimilated their culture, their history and their traditions to their surrounds to produce the very best."

More than 30 local and international pioneers of the paddock-to-plate philosophy will join forces to create a series of "backyard" events and collaborations, including the highly anticipated "In the company of" series.

"I spend so much time on the collaborations that I feel like I'm a dating agent," says Bryant. "It's really important that people are like-minded and there's a cross-pollination of ideas."

Ethos and interest are Bryant's main matchmaking criteria when he's pairing up talent. Tasting Australia guests can look forward to an Agrarian Kitchen-style lunch menu from Tasmanian farmer (and GT regular) Rodney Dunn at Ngeringa Farm and a city-meets-country locavore dinner by screen stars Sean Connolly (Sean's Kitchen) and Paul West (River Cottage Australia).

"The process is really organic," says Bryant. "When I came up with the idea for Paul, I went to visit him on the NSW South Coast - that's a long way to go to ask someone to come to the festival. A few months later we went for dinner at Sean's and I introduced them - the conversation just kept evolving."

But the festival isn't just about courtship and wooing. On opening night, A Cheong Liew Retrospective is reuniting old friends, too, in a degustation prepared by seven former apprentices to the chef and festival ambassador.

Although Bryant is remaining tight-lipped about the Liew line-up, he says guests can expect chefs from each era that were most influenced by Liew's work - like Cape Lodge's Michael Elfwing and Tallwood's Matt Upson, perhaps. "A kitchen has to have harmony," says Bryant. "And when they click, it's such a testament to the industry."

Tasting Australia, 1-8 May, 2016. Tickets are on sale now.

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