Healthy Eating

We're championing fresh food that packs a flavour punch, from salads and vegetable-packed bowls to grains and light desserts.

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Farro recipes

Farro can be used in almost any dish, from a robust salad to accompany hearty beer-glazed beef short ribs to a new take on risotto with mushrooms, leek and parmesan. Here are 14 ways with this versatile grain.

Aløft

There's nothing new about Nordic interiors - blond timbers, concrete surfaces, warm, mid-century charm without the twee - and thank heavens for that. It's a style that augments the beauty of everything around it, in this case, gorgeous Hobart harbour, which makes up one whole wall. What is new here, however, is the food - by veterans of Garagistes, which once dazzled diners down the road, Vue de Monde in Melbourne and Gordon Ramsay worldwide. There's a strong Asian bent, but with Tasmanian ingredients. In fact, the kitchen's love of the local verges on obsessive - coconut milk in an aromatic fish curry is replaced with Tasmanian-grown fig leaf simmered in cream to mimic the flavour. Other standouts include a gutsy red-braised lamb with gai lan and chewy cassia spaetzle, pigs' ears zingy with Sichuan pepper and a fresh, springy berry dessert. While the food is sourced locally, the generous wine list spans the planet. 

Secret Tuscany

A far cry from Tuscany’s familiar gently rolling hills, Monte Argentario’s appealing mix of mountain, ocean, island and lagoon makes it one of Italy’s hidden treasures, writes Emiko Davies.

Where to stay, eat and drink in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Beyond Kuala Lumpur's shopping malls, Lara Dunston finds a flourishing third-wave coffee scene, tailored food tours and charming neighbourhoods.

Moon Park to open Paper Bird in Potts Point

No, it’s not a pop-up. The team behind Sydney’s Moon Park is back with an all-day east-Asian eatery.

Kisume, Melbourne

Chris Lucas has flown in talent from all over the world, including Eleven Madison Park, for his bold new venture. Here’s what to expect from Kisume.

O Tama Carey's fried eggs with seeni sambol, coconut and turmeric

"I first cooked a version of this dish - inspired by the excellent deep-fried egg dish at Billy Kwong - while working at a restaurant in Sri Lanka," says O Tama Carey. "The lattice-like eggs are doused in a creamy turmeric curry sauce and topped with seeni sambol, a sweet-spiced caramelised onion relish. This dish is equally perfect for an indulgent breakfast as it is served as part of a larger meal." The recipe for the seeni sambol makes more than you need, but to get the right balance of spices you need to make at least this much. It keeps refrigerated for up to three weeks; use as an onion relish. The curry sauce can be made a day or two ahead.

Grilled apricot salad with jamon and Manchego

Here we've scorched apricots on the grill and served them with torn jamon, shaved Manchego and peppery rocket leaves. Think of it as a twist on the good old melon-prosciutto routine. The mixture would also be great served on charred sourdough.

Glebe Point Diner, Sydney restaurant review

Two blokes with an impressive pedigree open a Glebe diner that’s a bastion of simple and honest regional cooking.

Blame the buzz words, but chefs who pay lip-service to the idea of seasonal or market-driven cooking and then offer laminated menus as unchanging as Peter Garrett's hairstyle make me want to kill. Or at least look somewhere else for lunch. There's little danger of that at Glebe Point Diner. In fact, they don't really have a printed menu at all. What they've got is a blackboard menu of maybe five entrées, six mains and four desserts. To that board's right is another smaller board listing the provenance of the day's produce in hasty chalk: Bermagui tuna, Coffin Bay oysters, Snowy Mountains pork, and so on. I've eaten at the restaurant five times in the past month and have seen substantial changes to the lineup each time. It's food that, if not local, is certainly seasonal, and cooked with an eye to its origins. And they have not one but two beers on tap from fabled local brewer Scharer's. Thinking regional never tasted so good.

Some of the dishes that have been more constant, like the chicken liver paté and the honey and rosemary panna cotta with baked quince, speak strongly of the provenance of the restaurant itself. Chef Alex Kearns and manager Andrew John both worked at Sean's Panaroma in Bondi for some time, and while Glebe Point Diner has a definite character of its own, anyone familiar with Sean's will see clear parallels. The paté is plated with a house-made organic bread that also speaks of Kearns' last job, at Bourke Street Bakery, but the quenelle shape it's served in, and the accompanying leeks braised in vin santo - not to mention the voluptuous breadth of flavour and fine texture - is pure Sean's. I've never seen a rosemary and honey panna cotta at Sean's, but the taste of this most sublimely set little number (paired admirably with that luscious quince) is pleasantly reminiscent of the Bondi restaurant's signature rosemary and white chocolate nougat.

Don't think for a second that I'm implying a paucity of original ideas or plagiarism of any sort on the part of the Glebe Pointers. They've got Sean Moran's blessing, for one thing. And if you were looking for a model for the perfect modern Australian neighbourhood restaurant, Sean's Panaroma would be a bloody good start. The Diner, as its name suggests, has a more casual vibe, with close-packed tables and bar seating perfect for solo diners and drop-ins. There's no beach view, but there's outside seating overlooking a beautiful old house on one of the lovelier, leafy point-end stretches of Glebe Point Road. The kitchen is open, the ceilings are high, the walls striped and the large lamp-shades very North Bondi Italian. Tables are paper over marble, the music is good, and the noise level is fair. I'd call it laid-back rather than intimate.

I like the food very much; I think it has broad appeal, both in conception and execution, but it's by no means dumbed-down. In its pared back nature, it strikes me as a cross between provincial Italian and London's St John, with a dash of nanna's house. Few dishes see more than three elements on a plate. Fried squid is as tender as wine gums, crisply battered and paired with a very yolky, slightly olive oil-bitter mayo and some fried parsley. It lasts maybe half a minute with a Scharer's lager. Ditto the tartare of excellent tuna with dried chilli and fennel seed on crostini.

Entrée salads, like the paper-thin slices of fennel, parmesan and pear or the chickpeas and silverbeet with pickled carrot, aren't much bigger than sides, but are invariably great eating, if a little heavy on the oil. Pasta ranges from the seemingly virtuous - orecchiette with radicchio and chilli oil or just broad beans and artichokes - to the clearly sinful - beef shoulder braised with chunky green olives on rigatoni - but the quality doesn't waver. Sorrel soup has just enough peas in it to balance out the leaf's sharpness; a couple of Coffin Bay virgin oysters shucked in before it's brought to the table take things on a turn for the luxurious.

So far, I've only had one main course I didn't like - mirror dory with mussels on the shell with broad beans and hand-cut chips. Nothing wrong with any element there, but they didn't have any real connection on the plate that I could see. It's quite the opposite story with the wickedly succulent Oaks organic chook roasted with bread sauce, greens and crisp taties - a holy trinity of good ingredients cooked with skill.

And, even though it's a blackboard menu, there are specials. Mention may be made, for instance, of some beef ribs or boutique-breed pork that has spent the entire previous evening in a slow oven. The Angus and wagyu ribs, yabba-dabba-doo in their heft and intensity, share the plate with field mushrooms and Roman beans. The buttery, shred-tender shoulder of pork beds down with savoy cabbage and apple sauce. There is nothing extraneous on these plates and everything plays its part. They are superb.

The aforementioned panna cotta is by far the highlight of the desserts, though a glossy chocolate ganache tart with perfect pastry, and banana and pear brown-sugar fritters with rum-and-raisin ice-cream show plenty of promise, and there's also a workable tiramisù. Service isn't quite Swiss-watch yet, but it's certainly friendly, and with the capable, personable John at the fore, things are looking good, and the short, sweet wine list he has thrown together is good fun, much of it available in 500ml carafes as well as by the glass.

Call Glebe Point Diner a triumph of good sense and straight-talking, if not good fun. If the foam-jelly-and-smear school of cooking irks you, the diner, with its blessedly untricked-up presentation is your inverted comma-free oasis. There are no mission statements on the menus and their philosophy of the virtue of freshness, diversity and honest cooking is expounded only through the high quality of their food and service.

I think you'll find the argument very persuasive.


Glebe Point Diner

407 Glebe Point Road, Glebe, NSW, (02) 9660 2646. Licensed and BYO. Lunch Thu-Sun, dinner Wed-Sat. Visa and Mastercard accepted.

Prices

Entrées $14-$18; mains $28; desserts $12.

Noise

Like a diner.

Vegetarian

Slim pickings.

Wheelchair access

No.

Plus

Great food at everyday prices.

Minus

The table by the door sucks.

Glebe Point Diner

407 Glebe Point Road, Glebe, NSW, (02) 9660 2646. Licensed and BYO. Lunch Thu-Sun, dinner Wed-Sat. Visa and Mastercard accepted.

Prices

Entrées $14-$18; mains $28; desserts $12.

Noise

Like a diner.

Vegetarian

Slim pickings.

Wheelchair access

No.

Plus

Great food at everyday prices.

Minus

The table by the door sucks.

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