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Australian Gourmet Traveller recipe for Sauerruben

By Rodney Dunn
  • 20 mins preparation
  • 25 mins cooking plus pickling, cooling

Sauerruben is a close cousin of sauerkraut, the difference being it's made from turnips instead of cabbage. I like to use swedes, however, for their colour. Serve sauerruben on an open sandwich with thinly sliced coppa and mustard mayonnaise or on a Reuben sandwich. It also works well with corned beef and mashed potato as a main course, or mixed through a potato salad with mustard vinaigrette and lots of parsley and mint. Boiling the sauerruben in the jar (step 2) makes the product shelf-stable at room temperature, so you can store it in a pantry. Alternatively, if you have room in the fridge, you can omit this step and refrigerate the sauerruben for two months. You'll need to begin this recipe a month ahead.


  • 1 kg swedes, finely shredded on a mandolin
  • 30 gm fine sea salt


  • 1
    Combine swede and 20gm salt in a large mixing bowl, then pack firmly into a large sterilised jar. Combine remaining salt with 450ml water in a large bowl and stir until dissolved. Pour over swede to cover, then pour some of the remaining brine into a Ziploc bag, seal tightly and place on top of swede to keep it submerged in the brine. Set aside in a warm place (about 22-25C) to pickle until it tastes to your liking (2-4 weeks).
  • 2
    Remove Ziploc bag, seal jar with a lid and place in a large saucepan lined with a tea towel. Add cold water to cover jar completely, bring to the boil over medium-high heat, reduce heat to medium and simmer for 20 minutes. Leave jar in water to cool, then remove and store in a cool, dark place. Sauerruben will keep for 12 months.


This recipe is from the May 2012 issue of .
Drink Suggestion: Big, ballsy Barossa shiraz. Drink suggestion by Max Allen

  • Author: Rodney Dunn