The Paris issue

Our October issue is on sale - the Paris special. Grab your copy for all-things Parisian, plus ultimate French baking recipes and more.

Subscribe to Gourmet

Subscribe to Australian Gourmet Traveller before October 24, 2016 and receive 3 BONUS ISSUES - save 46%.

Gourmet on your iPad

Subscribe to Gourmet Traveller for your iPad.

Seven ways to do dumplings

Dumplings may be bite-sized, but they pack a flavourful punch. Here are seven mouth-watering recipes, from Korean mandu to classic Chinese-style steamed dumplings.

Best feta recipes

Feta's tang livens up all sorts of dishes, from beef shin rigatoni or blistered kale ribs to Greek-style roast lamb neck.

Recipes with zucchini

Whether served raw with olive oil, grated with fresh herbs, or pan-fried in a pancake - zucchini is a must-have ingredient when it comes to spring cooking.

Pickett's Deli & Rotisserie, Melbourne

Here’s Pickett’s inside running on the menu at Melbourne's new European-style eatery and wine bar Pickett's Deli & Rotisserie.

Nougat, salted peanut caramel and milk chocolate tart

What's not to love about a Snickers bar? All the elements are here, but if you don't feel like making your own nougat, you could always scatter some diced nougat in the base of the tart instead. The caramel is dark, verging on bitter, while a good whack of salt cuts through some of the sweetness - extra roasted salted peanuts on top can only be a good thing.

Apfel kuchen

"This is my mother's famous apple cake. The apples are macerated with sugar, cinnamon and lemon, and this lovely juice produces the icing," says Brigitte Hafner. The apples can be prepared the night before and kept in the fridge. This cake keeps well for four days and is at its best served the day after it's made."

Chicken stir-fried with holy basil and chilli

Melbourne's best late-night bars

As the shutters come down in other Australian capitals, Melbourne's vibrant nightlife is just hitting it's stride. Michael Harden burns the midnight oil at the city's best late-night bars and diners.

Fergus Henderson's tips for entertaining

Fergus Henderson gives new meaning to hamming it up in his top tips for successful entertaining.

Let's not muck around here - whatever tips you may want to take away from this party issue, the first thing you want to get in hand is the drinks.

As soon as booze is involved with a large number of people, in my experience, a little gentle contentment sets in. But a lesser-known useful tip to further this contentment is to have someone in the middle of your party carving slices from a Spanish ham. This focus is very therapeutic - just as the feng shui people believe fish ponds and raked sand induce tranquillity, likewise folk at a party will calmly stand for ages and watch a ham being sliced, making this a very fine and subliminal form of crowd control. Just don't give in to offers from guests to slice the ham themselves once the first few cocktails have been downed. That is guaranteed to end in tears, if not stitches.

It may seem out of kilter to talk of giving a party in the same terms the police might use to speak about managing mobs after a football match, but there are basic similarities. The herd mentality is not to be underestimated. You want it to go off happily and without anyone injuring themselves, which sounds reasonable, and none of the theories detailed here should be intrusive to the core business of having fun.

Now, to the business of feeding the hordes. Seat everyone, if you can, with place names, which breaks up any factions that might have been forming. This solution will naturally collapse over the course of the evening (usually around the cheese course), but in itself causes a frisson of anticipation over the meal about the forthcoming conversation. Once seated, serving the food family-style is a wonderful way to get folk together; there's something very bonding about helping your neighbour to their lunch.

Have you ever partied in someone else's hotel suite? There's a special tension there between the sense of freedom you feel being in an anonymous space and the voice in your head reminding you that the space is not your own and therefore some kind of order should be maintained. Contrast this with the time I rather foolhardily asked the whole restaurant team from St John back to my place for a drink after our Christmas party. They rightly thought that it was their day, which somehow made it okay to smash every glass in the apartment. I took this as a sign that they were feeling comfortable, which was reassuring, and quietly resolved never to have them over en masse ever again.

Like glass smashing, there are those telltale signs that the party is slipping away from you. It's important to monitor these as your merrymaking proceeds although admittedly some are easier to spot than others. The signifier closest to me is when my dear wife starts dancing with chairs, which routinely entails her swinging them around like an obliging dance partner (but a little more destructive). So if we are at a party together and you hear me shouting "No chairs!" then you know what's afoot. Take shelter.

I feel we have covered a whole gamut of emotions here this month, which is very appropriate for this subject - giving a good party is emotional stuff. The initial fear is that of wondering whether anyone will turn up, then they do and you can relax for a moment, and then suddenly the dancing-with-chairs moment creeps up on you, and that contentment passes. But everyone sounds like they're having such a nice time. They have the ham, so don't worry about them.

Party on, I say.

Illustration Lara Porter

  • Magazine:
  • Nov 2014
Newsletter

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.

Latest news
The second Gourmet Traveller Chinese-language edition is here
27.09.2016
Recipes by Stanbuli
27.09.2016
Recipes by Yama Kitchen & Bar
20.09.2016
Cutting edge: Sydney’s new Chef’s Armoury store
16.09.2016
What is migas?
15.09.2016
Richard Cornish’s year without meat
12.09.2016
GT
Signature Collection

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

Read More
Twenty
things to do this autumn

Whether it's foraging for wild mushrooms in a picturesque Victorian forest or watching a film by moonlight in Darwin, we've got you covered with 20 exciting autumn experiences from around Australia.

Read More
Gourmet TV

Check out our YouTube channel for our latest cover recipes, chef cooking demos, interviews and more.

Watch Now

You might also like...

Adriano Zumbo's Christmas recipes

So you think you know trifle? Think again. Adriano Zumbo tur...

Holiday entertaining recipes

Dare to think outside the box this season with an elegant lu...

David Thompson's Thai recipes

Scholarship and street food come together in David Thompson’...

Strawberry recipes

Sweet, juicy and bursting with flavour, strawberries add a b...

Longrain recipes

It’s been 10 years since Longrain introduced us to big Thai ...

Barbecue recipes

Grab the tongs and novelty apron and fire up your imaginatio...

Fast spring recipes

Fast and fresh food can be ready in just 30 minutes with the...

Chorizo recipes

Where would Spanish cuisine be without the chorizo? This ver...

Recipes inspired by Julia Child

So you can't wait to watch Julie & Julia and don't have a co...

Spanish dessert recipes

The Spanish know exactly how to sweeten the post-prandial de...

Recipes from Spain's Catalonia region

Who better to extol the virtues of this rich Spanish cuisine...

Recipes from Spain's Basque country

Spanning the French and Spanish borders and the fertile land...

Tapas recipes

Small bites of savoury delights and a glass or two of sherry...

Fast Spanish recipes

Put down that packaged meal and step away from the microwave...

Light spring lunches

Spring ingredients sparkle when handled with a little tender...

get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.

×