The Christmas issue

Our December issue is out now, featuring Paul Carmichael's recipes for a Caribbean Christmas, silly season cocktails and more.

Subscribe to Gourmet

Subscribe to Australian Gourmet Traveller before 28th December, 2016 for your chance to win a share of $50,000!

Gourmet digital

Subscribe to Gourmet Traveller for your iPad or Android tablet.

Mango recipes

Nothing says summer like mangoes. Go beyond the criss-cross cuts - bake a mango-filled meringue loaf with lime mascarpone, start off the day with a sweet coconut quinoa pudding with sticky mango, or toss it through a spicy warm weather Thai salad.

Garlic recipes

This pungent yet essential little bulb sets the foundation for countless dishes across the globe. Slowly roast it alongside spatchcock or whole snapper, or grind it down to thick paste for a rich alioli. When it comes to garlic, the possibilities truly are endless.

Taming the Wilderness

Heading to Canada’s far-flung places means a whole lot of adventure with life’s luxuries on the side.

Shark Bay Wild Scampi Caviar

Bright blue scampi roe is popping up on menus across Australia. Here's why it's so special.

Cooking breakfast like a chef

Direct from our Fare Exchange column and recipe vault, we've picked the best breakfast recipes from chefs cooking around Australia. From croque-monsieur to Paris Brest, you won't find poached eggs on toast here. All of the dishes are the perfect accompaniment to your morning coffee.

Dark chocolate delice, salted-caramel ganache and chocolate sorbet

"The delice from Source Dining is a winner. May I have the recipe?" Rebecca Ward, Fitzroy, Vic REQUEST A RECIPE To request a recipe, email fareexchange@bauer-media.com.au or send us a message via Facebook. Please include the restaurant's name and address, as well as your name and address. Please note that because of the volume of requests we receive, we can only publish a selection in the magazine.

Koh Loy Sriracha Sauce, David Thompson's favourite hot sauce

When the master of Thai food pinpoints anything as his favourite, we sit up and listen.

The most popular spring recipes of 2016

From fast stir-fries to decadent chocolate desserts, take inspiration from spring's most popular salads, roasts and more in 2016.

Wiener schnitzel


You'll need

6 veal schnitzels (about 160 gm each) 75 gm plain flour 2 eggs, lightly beaten 200 gm fresh fine breadcrumbs 60 gm butter or lard, coarsely chopped To serve: lemon wedges   Fried potatoes 1 kg small kipfler potatoes 70 gm speck, cut into lardons   Fennel and radish slaw 6 radishes, trimmed and thinly sliced 2 fennel bulbs, thinly sliced, fronds reserved 300 gm white cabbage, finely shredded 60 ml (¼ cup) white wine vinegar 55 gm (¼ cup) caster sugar 2 tsp caraway seeds 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

Method

  • 01
  • For fried potatoes, cook potatoes in boiling salted water until just tender (15-20 minutes). Drain, cool, peel, cut into 5mm-thick slices and set aside. Heat a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add speck and cook until starting to colour (3-5 minutes). Add potatoes and turn occasionally until golden (5-7 minutes). Season to taste, remove from heat and keep warm.
  • 02
  • Meanwhile, for fennel and radish slaw, place radish in a small non-reactive bowl. Combine fennel slices and cabbage in a separate non-reactive bowl. Combine vinegar, sugar and 60ml water in a saucepan, bring to the boil over high heat, then pour one-quarter of the liquid over radish and remaining liquid over fennel mixture. Set aside to cool. Dry-roast caraway seeds until fragrant (2-3 minutes). Drain fennel mixture and radish (discard liquid), combine in a bowl, add caraway seeds, olive oil, and fennel fronds, season to taste, toss and set aside.
  • 03
  • Place flour, eggs and breadcrumbs in separate shallow bowls. Working with one piece of veal at a time, dip in flour, then egg, then breadcrumbs to coat, shaking off excess between layers. Repeat with remaining veal slices. Set aside.
  • 04
  • Heat a large frying pan over medium-high heat, add half the butter, when foaming add half the schnitzel and cook, turning once, until golden and cooked through (3-5 minutes). Transfer to a plate and keep warm. Wipe pan clean with absorbent paper, then repeat with remaining butter and schnitzel. Serve immediately with slaw, potatoes and lemon wedges.

Dishes that fall into the “classic” category ask to be cooked time and again, their appeal traversing generations and often cultures. Wiener schnitzel is one such dish.

Not all schnitzels are equal. Their preparation and cooking methods are similar – a piece of meat breaded then baked or fried – but it’s the accompaniments that distinguish one schnitzel from another.

Dating back to when the Roman legions marched through the Alps around 100BC, there are many incarnations (Florentiner Kalbsschnitzel, served with tomatoes and risotto; Holsteiner schnitzel, topped with a fried egg; and paprikaschnitezel, with paprika sauce, to name but three), but it’s Wiener schnitzel that has entered the realms of the classic.

Austria’s most famous dish outside Austria is a simple affair. A thin escalope of veal is dredged in flour, egg and breadcrumbs before being shallow-fried. Many Austrians insist it must be cooked in lard. Regardless, it’s traditionally accompanied by a slice of lemon, lingonberry jam, and potato salad or butter-tossed potatoes with parsley.

It’s similar to Italy’s famous costoletta alla Milanese, which is crumbed and most often cooked on the bone. Alan Davidson’s The Oxford Companion to Food explains the difference neatly: “the Milanese cut the meat from the rib and fry it in butter, whereas the Austrians take the escalope from the leg, and fry it in lard”.

With Austria’s influx of Italian and German immigrants in the late 19th century came an increased appetite for veal, and costoletta may have crossed the Alps with those Italian migrants, morphing into Wiener schnitzel later.

For our version of the Austrian classic, the potatoes remain (albeit the crisp, fried variety) and it’s lightened up with fennel and radish slaw. A good squeeze of lemon is a must. After years languishing in the bain-marie wilderness, the time has come for this old favourite to regain its rightful place on our dinner tables.


At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people
GT
Signature Collection

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

Read More
The GT x STILY
Christmas Boutique is now open

The smallgoods, homewares, art and more from the pages of GT are now all under one roof, ready to take their place under the tree.

Read More
Gourmet TV

Check out our YouTube channel for our latest cover recipes, chef cooking demos, interviews and more.

Watch Now

At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people

You might also like...

Adriano Zumbo's Christmas recipes

recipes

Christmas pudding ice-cream

Holiday entertaining recipes

recipes

Raspberry and Mint Mojito

David Thompson's Thai recipes

recipes

Neil Perry: Prawn cocktail

Strawberry recipes

recipes

Serge Dansereau: Blueberry vanilla tart

Longrain recipes

recipes

Barbecue trout bundles with prosciutto and button mushrooms

Barbecue recipes

recipes

Serge Dansereau: Homemade lemonade

Fast spring recipes

recipes

Serge Danserau: Duck confit and potato terrine

Chorizo recipes

recipes

conversion tool

 
get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.

×