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Food-truck tribulations
29.03.2017

Chicken or pork? Kelly Eng takes on a food-truck challenge but fails to cement her millennial credentials.

Take me to the river
29.03.2017

For serial cruisers who have done the Danube and knocked off the Nile, less familiar waterways beckon.

Gourmet Institute is back for 2017
29.03.2017

Fire-up the stove, tie on your favourite apron and let’s get cooking, food fans. This year’s line-up is brimming with talent.

The Royal Mail Hotel is changing
28.03.2017

Executive chef Robin Wickens has a stronger influence at the Royal Mail Hotel's upcoming restaurant, slated to open later this year.

Adventuring along America's north-west rivers
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The rivers of America's north-west running through Washington state and Oregon form the arteries of epic landscapes and bold discovery routes. Emma Sloley follows in the wake of Lewis and Clark.

The World's Best sommeliers are coming to Australia
28.03.2017

For the first time, the world's top international sommeliers will take part in the World's 50 Best Awards too.

Seven Italian dishes that shaped fine dining in the 2000s
28.03.2017

Italian food in the restaurants of Australia blossomed into maturity in the new millennium, as the work of these trailblazers shows – dazzling and diverse, a successful balance between adaptation and tradition.

Steam ovens: a guide
27.03.2017

Billed as the faster, cleaner way to cook, are these on-trend ovens all they’re cracked up to be? We take a close look at their rising popularity, USP versus the traditional convection cooker and how each type rates in terms of form, function, and above all, flavour in this buyer’s guide.

Fast autumn dinners

Autumn weather signals the arrival of soups, broths, roasts and more hearty meals.

Flour and Stone Recipes

Baker extraordinaire Nadine Ingram of Sydney's Flour and Stone cooks up a sweet storm for Easter, including the much loved bakery's greatest hit.

Roasted cauliflower salad with yoghurt dressing and almonds

The cauliflower is roasted until it starts to caramelise, which adds extra depth of flavour to this winning salad. Serve it warm or at room temperature.

All Star Yum Cha

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Lemon tart

It's really important to seal the pastry well to prevent any seepage during cooking, and to trim the pastry soon after cooking. Let the tart cool in the tin before removing it, or it will crack.

Melbournes finest meet Worlds Best

Leading chefs descend on Melbourne in April for The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. We asked local hospitality folk who they’d abduct for the day and where they’d take them to show off their city. There may be coffee, there may be culture, but in the end it’s cocktails.

Spelt cashew and broccoli bowl with yoghurt dressing

This nicely textured salad transports well, making it ideal for picnics or to take to barbecues. The broccoli can be kept raw and shaved on a mandolin, too.

Savoury tarts

Will your next baking project be a flaky puff pastry with pumpkin, goat's curd and thyme, or a classic bacon and Stilton tart? As autumn settles in, we're ticking these off one by one.

Enter the Chang

David Chang is one of the most talked-about guests at this year's Melbourne Food & Wine Festival but is perhaps also one of the most misunderstood. "What do we do at Momofuku? That's the hardest question ever," says Chang. He's a Korean-American, raised in Virginia, and has worked in Japan, but his food is far from strictly Korean or Japanese or even pan-Asian. "We're just trying to serve good food, regardless of the price range. I'm not averse to the word fusion now. What food culture isn't a fusion of other food cultures?" After working in several notable restaurants in Manhattan, Chang decided to open Momofuku Noodle Bar in the East Village. But though the name of the restaurant is Japanese (it means lucky peach) and its focus is ramen, the palette is broad enough to include Tennessee bacon in the dashi stock, and its northern Chinese-style pork-belly buns have become the stuff of chowhound legend. "Are they good? They are. Are they something that sprang from our collective imagination like Athena out of Zeus's forehead?" Chang writes. "Hell no. They're just our take on a pretty common Asian food formula: steamed bread plus tasty meat equals good eating."

Failure has been the mother of some of Momofuku's success. Though it teetered on the brink of bankruptcy for a while, the Noodle Bar brought Momofuku a modicum of renown. In 2006 Chang decided to open a second restaurant, with the ssäm, a Korean wrap, as its focus. Chang's version of the ssäm, burrito-like in its pork-stuffed tortilla construction, wasn't a hit. "The general take on the Ssäm Bar in its first incarnation was, 'this place sucks, the food is stupid, this guy was a total one-hit wonder'," he writes in the Momofuku cookbook. In dire straits and with nothing else to lose, Chang and fellow chefs Joaquin Baca and Tien Ho decided to let loose, and their no-holds-barred late-night menu, swooping from corn dogs to veal-head terrines, was a near overnight success. It soon became the only menu, placing country hams from Kentucky and Virginia cheek-by-jowl with polished takes on Vietnamese baguettes and Sichuan beef tendon; the burrito-ssäms became history and the restaurant was a hit.

With the Noodle Bar humming along and the Ssäm Bar bagging a three-star review from The New York Times, it was time for something new, and Chang's next restaurant, Momofuku Ko, took things to the next level. Chang had something of an epiphany at L'Astrance in Paris, and decided to open a restaurant as purely focused on cooking as he could manage. Opened in 2008, the small restaurant with sushi bar-style seating was intended to be "an interpretation of kaiseki cuisine" - highly formalised, very seasonal Japanese fine dining over a succession of small courses - "through an American lens." A place where an amuse-bouche of chicharrón, Mexican pork crackling, with Japanese seven-spice, might be followed by English muffins with bay leaf butter or soft-cooked hen's egg with caviar, onions and potato chips. With the focus so squarely on food ("no flowers, no vests and ties, no starched jacket and toques") and on a democratic approach to dining, Ko also featured an online reservation system. While the other two restaurants take no bookings, the only way to score one of Ko's 12 seats is to log on to momofuku.com first thing in the morning six days ahead of when you'd like to dine. With no exceptions to this approach for friends, VIPs, press or anyone else, the restaurant's continued acclaim in the face of such an annoying hurdle stands as testament to its essential qualities.

Following Ko, Momofuku expanded to a Milk Bar in 2009, a place that quickly gained a cult following for its cereal-milk ice-cream and Momofuku-ised Bacon & Egg McMuffin, made with slow-poached eggs, caramelised onions and lardons. The end of the same year saw Chang and journalist Peter Meehan publish Momofuku, one of the few cookbooks to contain the word "motherf***er" while also carrying blurbs from both Ferran Adrià and Martha Stewart. This month, meanwhile, should mark the opening of Má Pêche, a new restaurant at The Chambers hotel in Midtown Manhattan, where the Ssäm Bar's Tien Ho will be chef. "It's gonna be French-Vietnamese," Chang says. "Má is Vietnamese for mother and Pêche is French for peach. It's really about giving Tien room to run. I'm not going to bulls*** and say that I'm the chef at every place because I'm just not."

Dave Chang has never been to Melbourne. Or indeed any part of Australia. "All I know is what Tony Bourdain has told me. You're gonna love it, is what he said. Great chef culture, good people, great produce. Everyone I spoke to who went to the Melbourne Food & Wine Festival last year said they had a blast."

He'd like you to come to his sessions or dinner with an open mind. "Actually, I'm not concerned with how you enter, but I want you to leave thinking, holy s***, that was totally awesome," he says. "I'm looking forward to it."

Catch Momofuku's David Chang at the festival's Langham Melbourne Masterclass, 20 and 21 March, or at his dinner at Cumulus Inc, 18 March. For bookings and more information, see melbournefoodandwine.com.au.

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