Healthy Eating

We're championing fresh food that packs a flavour punch, from salads and vegetable-packed bowls to grains and light desserts.

Subscribe to Gourmet

Subscribe to Australian Gourmet Traveller for your chance to win a $20,000 Flight Centre gift card! Offer ends 24 May 2017.

Gourmet digital

Subscribe to Gourmet Traveller for your iPad or Android tablet.

Aløft

There's nothing new about Nordic interiors - blond timbers, concrete surfaces, warm, mid-century charm without the twee - and thank heavens for that. It's a style that augments the beauty of everything around it, in this case, gorgeous Hobart harbour, which makes up one whole wall. What is new here, however, is the food - by veterans of Garagistes, which once dazzled diners down the road, Vue de Monde in Melbourne and Gordon Ramsay worldwide. There's a strong Asian bent, but with Tasmanian ingredients. In fact, the kitchen's love of the local verges on obsessive - coconut milk in an aromatic fish curry is replaced with Tasmanian-grown fig leaf simmered in cream to mimic the flavour. Other standouts include a gutsy red-braised lamb with gai lan and chewy cassia spaetzle, pigs' ears zingy with Sichuan pepper and a fresh, springy berry dessert. While the food is sourced locally, the generous wine list spans the planet. 

Farro recipes

Farro can be used in almost any dish, from a robust salad to accompany hearty beer-glazed beef short ribs to a new take on risotto with mushrooms, leek and parmesan. Here are 14 ways with this versatile grain.

Secret Tuscany

A far cry from Tuscany’s familiar gently rolling hills, Monte Argentario’s appealing mix of mountain, ocean, island and lagoon makes it one of Italy’s hidden treasures, writes Emiko Davies.

Moon Park to open Paper Bird in Potts Point

No, it’s not a pop-up. The team behind Sydney’s Moon Park is back with an all-day east-Asian eatery.

Grilled apricot salad with jamon and Manchego

Here we've scorched apricots on the grill and served them with torn jamon, shaved Manchego and peppery rocket leaves. Think of it as a twist on the good old melon-prosciutto routine. The mixture would also be great served on charred sourdough.

A festival of cheese hits Sydney

Kick off winter with a week of cheese tasting.

Discovering Macedonia

Like its oft-disputed name, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia defies simple definition but its rich diversity extends from the dinner table to the welcoming locals, writes Richard Cooke.

Brae

Prepare to enter a picture of the countryside framed by note-perfect Australiana but painted in bold, elegant and unsentimental strokes. Over 10 or more courses, Dan Hunter celebrates his region with dishes that are formally daring (Crunchy prawn heads! Creamy oyster soft-serve! Sea urchin and chicory bread pudding!), yet rich in flavour and substance. The menu could benefit from an edit, but the plates are tightly composed - and what could you cut? Certainly not the limpid broth bathing fronds of abalone and calamari, nor the clever arrangement of lobster played off against charred waxy fingerlings under a swatch of milk skin. The adventure is significantly the richer for the cool gloss of the dining room, some of the most engaging service in the nation and wine pairings that roam with an easy-going confidence. Maturing and relaxing without surrendering a drop of its ambition, Brae is more compelling than ever.

Hometown heroes: Maurice Terzini and Robert Marchetti

Go behind-the-scenes at GA&S with Maurice Terzini and Robert Marchetti in our exclusive video feature.

Achieving something elsewhere has always been integral to the Australian cultural cringe, a prerequisite for domestic success in many vocations. And in microcosm, Sydney success has always been a handy qualification to bring home to Melbourne too.

The stories of Robert Marchetti and Maurice Terzini are not identical, yet both have ridden the homecoming float into Melbourne’s streets like Moomba kings with runs on the board in Australia’s biggest and possibly fussiest restaurant market.

Terzini, because of the public role he adopts as a restaurant creator and front-of-house svengali, was well-known in Melbourne when he moved to Sydney in the late 90s, leaving Caffé e Cucina, Il Bàcaro and Melbourne Wine Room in his wake, founding Otto, Icebergs Dining Room and North Bondi Italian Food.

Robert Marchetti is the other half of the odd couple; a chef who had worked in the shadow of his older step-brother Bill, a renowned chef of the 80s and 90s. Behind the scenes, Marchetti – steeped in Italian food culture – acted as manager-chef and business partner to style guru Terzini, helping to make Icebergs and North Bondi local – some would say international – fixtures. Along with Kimme Shaw (as financial controller and partner), they have proven a successful, complementary team of Melburnians in an adopted town. 

But even if the pair is now doing the bi-city thing (along with Neil Perry and Guillaume Brahimi) it is, it must be said, good to have them home and the breath of fresh air they’ve brought with them.

They created Giuseppe, Arnaldo & Sons (named for their fathers) around the designs of Rome-based Australian ex-pat Carl Pickering (the creative eye also behind Icebergs). Their brief: a New World, third-millennium Roman trattoria. The result: a moody, carefully lit series of Sicilian terracotta-tiled dining ‘pods’ that seem to float in a sea of black. It’s a sexy illusion and they’ve created it on a site that’s raised a few eyebrows – Crown. A mainstream venue unlike anything the pair had been involved in before.

GA&S is a revamped interpretation of the North Bondi schtick: a menu of many departments focusing on cliché-free Italian/Roman rustic food designed to offer flexibility. It steers away from the concept of service periods and three-course dining; whatever the mood, the time of the day, there’ll be something appropriate, from a slice of Marchetti’s own prosciutto to a carafe of house wine, on tap. “We wanted to do a really hip, modern trattoria, which is ultimately a venue that is all about fun. And we wanted to create something in our hometown we were really proud of ,” says Terzini.

With Terzini focused on that ineffable style factor and delivering the kind of personnel and service to meet head-on a swag of Crown-sceptics, Marchetti has built a kitchen and team to back the promise. Matthew Gilroy has moved to Melbourne (as have quite a few wait-staff) from his position as head chef at North Bondi while his co-head chef, Victorian Sara-Jane Quadara (who apprenticed at The Latin under Marchetti) is home from an extended, not to mention demanding, sabbatical in Europe that suggests she is made of stern stuff indeed. Like their employers, both have runs on the board elsewhere. It opens a few doors in Melbourne. Equally, however, they will need to earn their place in our hearts; early signs are positive [see our early review in the GT food blog]. Welcome home, one and all.

Giuseppe, Arnaldo & Sons, Crown, 8 Whiteman St, Southbank, Vic, (03) 9694 7400.

WORDS JOHN LETHLEAN PHOTOGRAPHY SHARYN CAIRNS

This article appeared in the May 2008 issue of Australian Gourmet Traveller.

Newsletter

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.

Latest news
Luke Burgess pops up in Hobart to test the waters
09.05.2017
Bacco Osteria e Espresso to open in Sydney’s CBD
09.05.2017
Meet Margaret River’s brightest new cooking talent
08.05.2017
Dear Sainte Eloise to open in Potts Point
01.05.2017
Fifty-four things that went through my mind while eating dinner at Noma Mexico
27.04.2017
Dining at Jackalope, Mornington Peninsula
20.04.2017
GT
Signature Collection

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

Read More
Recipe collections

Looking for ways to make the most out of seasonal produce? Want to find a recipe perfect for a party? Or just after fresh ideas for dessert? Either way, our recipe collections have you covered.

See more
2017 Restaurant Guide

Our 2017 Restaurant Guide is online, covering over 400 restaurants Australia wide. Never wonder where to dine again.

See more

You might also like...

Albert Street Food & Wine

Philippa Sibley may have left the building, but Albert St F...

Aravina Estate

The family-friendly nature of Aravina explains the terracot...

Assaggio

Assaggio's very red, very mod fit-out has undeniable flair,...

Aubergine

The grey-whiskered Ben Willis could pass for a maturing, bu...

Annie Smithers' Bistrot

Annie Smithers may have decamped for Du Fermier, but the bi...

Bacchus - Brisbane

Rydges doesn't exactly leap to mind when you think "complex...

Balla

Pronounce it "bah-la" for Piedmont-born artist and composer...

Balthazar

The mixing of business and pleasure comes second nature to ...

Boucher

Escargots, foie gras, bouillabaisse - the expected French s...

Carlton Wine Room

The relaxed ambience and witty, irreverent service may say ...

Celsius

A land of smoke and mirrors, Celsius is an urbane, nightclu...

Citron

Mark Newman's cassia beef cheek is the type of dish that ce...

Divido

To those who dream of the old country, Divido is the modern...

David’s

David's hums with renewed energy since its transformation t...

Eleonore’s

On the surface, Eleonore's seems immune to fashion. Its lar...

get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.

×