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Most popular recipes summer 2017

Counting down from 20, here are this summer's most-loved recipes.

Curtis Stone's strawberry, elderflower and brioche summer puddings

"Think of this dessert as a deconstructed version of a summer pudding, with thinly sliced strawberries macerated in elderflower liqueur and layered between slices of brioche," says Stone. "A dollop of whipped cream on top is a cooling counterpoint to the floral flavours."

Chorizo hotdogs with chimichurri and smoky red relish

A hotdog is all about the condiments. Here, choose between a smoky red capsicum relish or the bright flavours of chimichurri, or go for a bit of both.

Bali's new wave of restaurants, hotels and bars

The restaurant and hotel scene on Australia's favourite holiday island has never been more exciting and Australian chefs, owners and restaurateurs are leading the charge, writes Samantha Coomber.

Australia's best rieslings

We’re spoilt for variety – and value – in Australia when it comes to good riesling. Max Allen picks the top 20 from a fine crop.

Curtis Stone's strawberry and almond cheesecake

"I've made all kinds of fancy cheesecakes in my time, but nothing really beats the classic combination of strawberries and almonds with a boost from vanilla bean," says Stone. "I could just pile macerated strawberries on top, but why not give your tastebuds a proper party by folding grilled strawberries into the cheesecake batter too? Cheesecakes are elegant and my go-to for celebrations because they taste best when whipped up a day in advance."

Baguette recipes

These baguette recipes are picture-perfect and picnic ready, bursting with fillings like slow-cooked beef tongue, poached egg and grilled asparagus and classic leg ham and cheese.

World's Best Chefs Talks

Massimo Bottura and more are coming to the Sydney Opera House.

Trenette with pesto


You'll need

300 gm green beans, trimmed 1 large waxy potato (such as Desiree), peeled and diced 400 gm dried trenette (see note) 40 basil leaves 1 clove garlic 50 gm (1/3 cup) pine nuts 2 tbsp finely grated parmesan 1 tbsp finely grated Pecorino Sardo 60 ml (¼ cup) extra-virgin olive oil 2 tsp butter

Method

  • 01
  • Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil, add beans and potatoes and return to the boil. Add pasta and cook until al dente.
  • 02
  • Meanwhile, carefully wash basil leaves and pat dry. Place garlic and a pinch of sea salt in a mortar and, using a pestle, crush to a paste, add basil and continue pounding, then add pine nuts and cheeses and pound to a smooth paste. Transfer to a bowl and stir through olive oil. If using a blender, pulse all ingredients on lowest speed until pesto is creamy.
  • 03
  • Drain pasta, beans and potatoes, reserving some of the cooking water. Place pesto into a large mixing bowl and combine with pasta, 2 tbsp reserved cooking water, beans, potatoes and butter. The sauce is used only ‘a crudo’, that is, not cooked, so when adding to pasta it must be mixed off the heat. Serve immediately.

Note Trenette is a narrow, flat pasta, thicker than linguine, that is traditionally served with pesto.


"Basil originated in Asia and Africa but it is present all over the Mediterranean, and found a habitat in Italy in the climate and soil of Liguria," explains Sydney's Lucio Galletto. "It is there that the best of many varieties grow, and the Ligurian people learnt quickly how to use it gastronomically in the noblest way: pesto. This symbol of Ligurian cucina has very ancient origins: its roots are in an oriental sauce (Arabic or Persian) that was based on a mixture of pine nuts and fresh acidic cheese. Throughout the centuries, oil and basil were added to these ingredients, and the fresh cheese was substituted with grated parmesan and Pecorino because of the abundance of these ingredients in the region. The great debate is about the strength of the sauce: the amount of garlic used and the sharpness of the Pecorino. In the Riviera di Levante, near the Tuscan border (where this recipe is from), it is quite a mild sauce, and traditionally served with a durum wheat pasta such as trenette or spaghetti, with green beans and potatoes. Other types of pasta that can be served with pesto include trofie (little dumplings of wheat and chestnut flour, without egg) or gnocchi, mandili de sea ('silk handkerchiefs'; very fine fresh rag pasta). Purists may insist on using a stone mortar and a wooden pestle, but today almost everybody uses a blender, which gives excellent results. It is essential, however, not to overheat the oil, as this ruins the aroma of the basil, so minimum speed and frequent pauses for cooling are necessary."


At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people
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At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people

Featured in

May 2007

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