Gourmet Fast app

Get our Gourmet Fast app and you can download 140 recipes for your iPhone.

Subscribe to Gourmet

Subscribe this month and receive a copy of the Agrarian Kitchen cookbook by Rodney Dunn. Hurry, offer ends February 22.

Gourmet on your iPad

Download the latest issue of Gourmet Traveller for your iPad.

Recipes for big cuts

Go big this season with cuts large enough to feed a crowd: legs of lamb, sides of beef, suckling pigs, and whole fish. The pineapple jerked pork neck with crushed pineapple relish and black bean and rice salad is calling your name...

Bali's best local food

You haven’t eaten on Indonesia’s most popular island until you’ve explored the rich, bold flavours found in the traditional warungs. Bali insider Maya Kerthyasa takes us on a tour of the best.

Fast and fabulous recipes

Fast, fresh and fabulous – what’s not to like? Here's a preview of the recipes in our February 2015 issue.

Jamaican goat curry

"Goat is the world's most consumed meat and we hardly give it a look in Australia. I adore it in so many different preparations, from South-East Asian dishes through to Italian braises, but my favourite is Jamaican curry with its heady spices," says Evans. "I see spices as nature's medicine cabinet and use them in as much of my cooking as possible. If you can't get your hands on quality goat meat (farmers' markets are a good bet or online), then feel free to substitute lamb or another protein. But if you've never had goat before, I urge you to give it a whirl."

Top 10 Sydney Restaurants 2014

Looking for the best restaurants in Sydney? Here are the top ten Sydney restaurants from our 2014 Australian Restaurant Guide.

Pavlova Recipes

Everyone loves a pav. Here are some of our favourite recipes.

Top 10 Melbourne Restaurants 2014

Looking for the best restaurants in Melbourne? Here's our top ten from our 2014 Australian Restaurant Guide.

Classic Australian recipes

From barbecued prawns and party pies to lamingtons and Pavlova, these are ten Australian classics you can really sink your teeth into.

Trenette with pesto


You'll need

300 gm green beans, trimmed 1 large waxy potato (such as Desiree), peeled and diced 400 gm dried trenette (see note) 40 basil leaves 1 clove garlic 50 gm (1/3 cup) pine nuts 2 tbsp finely grated parmesan 1 tbsp finely grated Pecorino Sardo 60 ml (¼ cup) extra-virgin olive oil 2 tsp butter

Method

  • 01
  • Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil, add beans and potatoes and return to the boil. Add pasta and cook until al dente.
  • 02
  • Meanwhile, carefully wash basil leaves and pat dry. Place garlic and a pinch of sea salt in a mortar and, using a pestle, crush to a paste, add basil and continue pounding, then add pine nuts and cheeses and pound to a smooth paste. Transfer to a bowl and stir through olive oil. If using a blender, pulse all ingredients on lowest speed until pesto is creamy.
  • 03
  • Drain pasta, beans and potatoes, reserving some of the cooking water. Place pesto into a large mixing bowl and combine with pasta, 2 tbsp reserved cooking water, beans, potatoes and butter. The sauce is used only ‘a crudo’, that is, not cooked, so when adding to pasta it must be mixed off the heat. Serve immediately.

Note Trenette is a narrow, flat pasta, thicker than linguine, that is traditionally served with pesto.


"Basil originated in Asia and Africa but it is present all over the Mediterranean, and found a habitat in Italy in the climate and soil of Liguria," explains Sydney's Lucio Galletto. "It is there that the best of many varieties grow, and the Ligurian people learnt quickly how to use it gastronomically in the noblest way: pesto. This symbol of Ligurian cucina has very ancient origins: its roots are in an oriental sauce (Arabic or Persian) that was based on a mixture of pine nuts and fresh acidic cheese. Throughout the centuries, oil and basil were added to these ingredients, and the fresh cheese was substituted with grated parmesan and Pecorino because of the abundance of these ingredients in the region. The great debate is about the strength of the sauce: the amount of garlic used and the sharpness of the Pecorino. In the Riviera di Levante, near the Tuscan border (where this recipe is from), it is quite a mild sauce, and traditionally served with a durum wheat pasta such as trenette or spaghetti, with green beans and potatoes. Other types of pasta that can be served with pesto include trofie (little dumplings of wheat and chestnut flour, without egg) or gnocchi, mandili de sea ('silk handkerchiefs'; very fine fresh rag pasta). Purists may insist on using a stone mortar and a wooden pestle, but today almost everybody uses a blender, which gives excellent results. It is essential, however, not to overheat the oil, as this ruins the aroma of the basil, so minimum speed and frequent pauses for cooling are necessary."


At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people
GT
reader dinner

Join us for a very special reader dinner with The River Café's co-founder Ruth Rogers who's headlining the Melbourne Food & Wine Festival.

Read More
Win
one of ten dinners at Kazbah!

Win one of ten $200 vouchers to eat at Kazbah restaurant in New South Wales and Queensland. Get in quick!

Enter now
Gourmet TV

Check out our video section for our latest cover recipes, chef cooking demos, interviews and more.

Watch Now

At A Glance

  • Serves 6 people

Featured in

May 2007

You might also like...

A culinary Tour de France

recipes

Pork and pineapple tacos

Beef cheek recipes

recipes

Pave de boeuf with Roquefort sauce and gratin dauphinoise

Stuffed ancho chillies

recipes

Mole chichilo with chicken chichilo con pollo

Baked swordfish with fennel, lemons and capers (Pesce spada al forno)

recipes

Sweet and sour tuna (Tonno agrodolce)

Saltimbocca alla Romana

recipes

conversion tool

 
get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.