The 50th Anniversary Issue

Our 50th birthday issue is on sale now. We're celebrating five decades of great food and travel with our biggest issue yet.

Subscribe to Gourmet

Subscribe to Australian Gourmet Traveller before 27th November, 2016 and receive a Villeroy & Boch platter!

Gourmet on your iPad

Subscribe to Gourmet Traveller for your iPad.

Cruise control: Captain Kent of the Emerald Princess

We caught up with Princess Cruises’ Captain William Kent to talk life on deck, sailing the Red Sea and how to spend 24 hours in Venice.

Midnight in Melbourne style

After-dark glamour calls for monochrome elegance with accents of red and the glimmer of bling. Martinis await.

Recipes by David Thompson

Thai food maestro David Thompson returns to the Sydney restaurant scene with the opening of Long Chim, a standard-bearer for Thailand’s robust street food. Fiery som dtum is just the beginning.

Reader dinner: Quay, Sydney

Join us at Quay for a specially designed dinner by Peter Gilmore to celebrate the launch of the new Gourmet Traveller cookbook.

GT's party hamper

We’ve partnered again with our friends at Snowgoose to bring you the ultimate party hamper. With each item selected by the Gourmet Traveller team, it’s all killer and no filler.

Aerin Lauder’s Morocco

Meet Aerin Lauder; creative director, lifestyle mogul, mother and global traveller. Here she shares her musings on Morocco, the exotic catalyst for her latest collection.

A hotel dedicated to gin is opening in London

A modern-day gin palace, The Distillery, is set to open in the middle of London’s Portobello Market this year.

Dan Hong's salt and pepper calamari with lime aioli

The executive chef shares his salt and pepper squid recipe, including his secret for a crisp, light batter.


You'll need

800 ml milk 40 gm butter, plus extra, softened, for greasing and cooking 2 tsp caster sugar 7 gm dried yeast (1 sachet) 500 gm (3 1/3 cups) plain flour 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda


  • 01
  • Heat milk and butter over a low heat until butter melts, then stand until lukewarm. Combine sugar and yeast in a small bowl, add 200ml milk mixture, stir to dissolve then stand in a warm place until foamy (4-5 minutes).
  • 02
  • Combine flour and a pinch of salt in a large bowl, make a well in the centre and add yeast mixture, stirring to incorporate a little flour.
  • 03
  • Add remaining milk mixture, stir until smooth and combined, cover and stand in a warm place until very foamy (1-1½ hours).
  • 04
  • Dissolve bicarbonate of soda in 50ml warm water, add to batter, beat to combine.
  • 05
  • Cover and stand until bubbling (25-30 minutes).
  • 06
  • Heat a frying pan over low-medium heat. Add a little butter, then place buttered 10cm-diameter, 2.5cm-deep rings in pan and fill each two-thirds full with batter.
  • 07
  • Cook until mixture bubbles, small holes form on the surface and a skin forms on top (4-5 minutes).
  • 08
  • Remove rings, turn crumpets and cook until light golden (1 minute). Keep crumpets warm in a tea towel while you repeat with remaining batter, thinning with a little extra milk if necessary. Serve warm immediately or serve toasted the following day.

English cookery writer Elizabeth David was critical of commercially produced crumpets and she pulled no punches in her book English Bread and Yeast Cookery. "Crumpets, or at least terrible travesties of them… are more commonly sold packeted by grocers or supermarkets than by bakers. Perhaps indeed they are delivered direct from a plastics recycling plant, and have never been near a bakery," she wrote.

So what constitutes a good crumpet? Truth be told, we here at GT  quite enjoy a shop-bought crumpet, toasted, buttered and honeyed, but that said, we had not until recently eaten the freshly made variety.

The word "crumpet" is thought to derive from the Welsh crempog, a pancake or fritter, and it's likely they date from the 18th century. Like a pancake, a crumpet is made with a thin batter, but there the similarity ends: it differs greatly in texture and body. The signature hole-riddled texture is created variously by the addition of yeast or a chemical raising agent such as baking powder or bicarbonate of soda, or - in some cases - all of the above. The recipe here uses both yeast and bicarbonate of soda. The yeast does most of the work and is added at the first stage, transforming the almost-liquid batter into a bubbling mass. The addition of bicarbonate of soda, added after the batter has proved, accelerates the formation of holes once heat is applied to the batter and has the added benefit of lightening the texture of the finished crumpet.

Opinion differs regarding how to treat the mixing of the batter itself. Elizabeth David advocates vigorous beating to develop a certain elasticity, but we found that treating the batter more gently, and beating it only enough to incorporate the ingredients, results in a lighter, fluffier crumpet.

The consistency of the batter is key to success, and it's a changeable thing. It's worth noting that the batter thickens upon standing, so after you've cooked your first batch, you may need to thin the batter with a little lukewarm water or milk before you start cooking the second. If the batter is too thick, the holes won't be able to force their way through to the top, and the result will be what is known as a blind crumpet, lacking the characteristic honeycomb texture. That said, add too much liquid and batter will run out from under the rings, so be judicious and add just a little liquid at a time.

This brings us neatly to crumpet rings. Some specialist cookware shops sell rings the perfect size, complete with a little handle, making them easy to remove when the time comes. But as these can be a little difficult to come by, your best bet is to use a biscuit cutter. Ten centimetres is the perfect diameter, and you'll need them to be 2.5cm to 3cm deep so you end up with lovely thick crumpets (don't be tempted to resort to egg rings, which are nowhere near deep enough). Butter them generously with soft butter before using them.

A heavy-based frying pan, preferably cast-iron, is an essential tool. Warm it over a very low heat and grease it with a sliver of butter. Place the rings in the pan and fill them two-thirds full with batter. Do not over-fill or the batter will bubble up and spill over the tops of the rings. Cook until holes and a skin develop on the top of the crumpet, slip off the rings (loosen them with a small sharp knife if necessary), then turn the crumpets and cook the tops until light golden.

Eat them as soon as they're cooked or keep the crumpets warm in a tea towel, and reheat them in a covered dish in the oven. You can make them ahead and then toast them if you like, but you'll be hard-pressed to resist tucking into them straight away, especially when slathered with caramelised maple butter.

At A Glance

  • Serves 12 people
Signature Collection

Find out more about the Gourmet Traveller Signature Collection by Robert Gordon Australia, including where to buy it in store and online.

Read More
things to do this autumn

Whether it's foraging for wild mushrooms in a picturesque Victorian forest or watching a film by moonlight in Darwin, we've got you covered with 20 exciting autumn experiences from around Australia.

Read More
Gourmet TV

Check out our YouTube channel for our latest cover recipes, chef cooking demos, interviews and more.

Watch Now

At A Glance

  • Serves 12 people

Featured in

Aug 2011

You might also like...

Alistair’s secret barbecue sauce


Poached eggs with creamed corn and green chilli relish

Egg, spinach, rocket and feta breakfast tart


Grilled peaches with sherry and apricot-delight ice-cream

Lemon and raspberry iced tea


Ginger beer with lime

Pineapple-jerked pork neck with crushed pineapple relish and black bean and rice salad


conversion tool

get the latest news

Sign up to receive the latest food, travel and dining news direct from Gourmet Traveller headquarters.